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101
Appleby, Annie Alleen
Appleby, Annie Alleen
 
 
102
Appleton Family Crest
Appleton Family Crest
This name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is locational from any of the several places thus called, for example Appleton in Cumberland, Lancashire, Yorkshire, Norfolk, Cheshire, Berkshire and Kent. Recorded as "Apeltun" and "Epletune" in the Domesday Book of 1086 for the various counties, the name derives from the Olde English pre 7th Century "aeppeltun", an orchard, a compound of "aeppel", an apple, plus "tun", an enclosure or settlement. The surname is first recorded in the latter half of the 12th Century (see below), and other early recordings include: Thomas de Appleton, who appeared in the 1196 Pipe Rolls of Yorkshire, and William de Appleton, who was Rector of Titchwell, Norfolk, in 1376. Recordings from London Church Registers include: the marriage of John Appleton and Elizabeth Mylls on June 2nd 1561, at St. Dunstan in the East, and the christening of John, son of John Appleton, on January 30th 1567, at St. Botolph without Aldgate. In 1622, one Richard Appleton, aged 19 yrs., appears on a list of early emigrants into Elizabeth City, Virginia. Henry Appleton (flourished circa 1650) was a navy Captain and Commodore who served in the Dutch War (1652). The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Hemeri de Lepeltone, which was dated circa 1182, in the "Red Book of Worcestershire", during the reign of King Henry 11, known as "The Builder of Churches", 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
103
Appleton, Jacques and Marie Charlotte Billet Marriage Record
Appleton, Jacques and Marie Charlotte Billet Marriage Record
 
 
104
Appleton, Mary Victoria Bapisim Record
Appleton, Mary Victoria Bapisim Record
 
 
105
Appleton, Mary Victoria Death Record
Appleton, Mary Victoria Death Record
 
 
106
Appleton, Mary Victoria Fountian Grave Stone
Appleton, Mary Victoria Fountian Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
107
Appleton, Mary Victoria William E Fountain and Mary A Brain Grave Stone
Appleton, Mary Victoria William E Fountain and Mary A Brain Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
108
Apps, Frederick 1881
Apps, Frederick 1881
 
 
109
Apps, Frederick 1891
Apps, Frederick 1891
 
 
110
Apps, Julia 1891
Apps, Julia 1891
 
 
111
Apps, Julia 1901
Apps, Julia 1901
 
 
112
Arcand Family Crest
Arcand Family Crest
French: of uncertain origin, perhaps from a personal name containing the Old High German element ercan 'precious', 'excellent' (borrowed, via Latin, from Greek archi- 'the first', 'the highest'). 
 
113
Arderne Family Crest
Arderne Family Crest
This interesting surname has a very ancient history either of Celtic or Anglo-Saxon origin. It is a regional name either from Arden, north east of Stockport in Cheshire, or from the district thus called in Warwickshire where the old forest, supposed to be the origin of Shakespeare's "Forest of Arden", is situated. Both places were initially recorded as "Arderne" in the 13th Century Curia Regis Rolls of the respective counties, and are believed to be linguistically identical with the forest of the Ardennes in France and Belgium, so called from a Celtic word meaning "high". Alternatively, the name may be Anglo-Saxon in origin, derived from the Olde English pre 7th Century "eardaern", dwelling-house. The surname has the distinction of being first recorded in the Domesday Book, and the namebearer is shown to have held more lands than any other non-Norman Englishman. One Heloise de Arderne was noted in early medieval records of Norfolk, dated 1171, and 13th Century entries of the name abound in Cheshire Church Registers. They include the birth of Walkelyn de Arderne, son of John de Arderne and Margaret de Aldford, at Aldford, in 1216. A notable bearer of the name was John Arderne (flourished 1370), known as "the first great English surgeon". No less than twenty Coats of Arms have been granted to this illustrious family, the one most associated with the name being a red shield with six crosses crosslet fitchee, and a gold chief. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Thurkill de Warwick, also known as Thurkill de Arden, which was dated circa 1085, in the Domesday Book of Warwickshire, during the reign of King William 1, known as "William the Conqueror", 1066 - 1087. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling 
 
114
Arellano Family Crest
Arellano Family Crest
 
 
115
Argue Family Crest
Argue Family Crest
This rare surname is of medieval English origins, although with French and Roman overtones. It is recorded in the modern surname spellings of Argen, Argon, Argent, Argo, Argoe, Argue, Hargy, Hargerie, and no doubts others as well. All are quite rare, although 'Argue' is relatively popular in Northern Ireland, David Argue being recorded at Dromore, County Down, on April 4th 1795, and Catherine Argo, at the same place on August 4th 1821. The name however spelt is either a nickname for a person with silver-grey hair, or it is locational and of French origin, from one of the several French villages called 'Argent', or finally it is possible that it may be occupational for either a silver smith, or possibly one who worked in a silver mine. The name development and recordings include John Largent in the Suffolk Hearth Tax rolls of 1524, Aaron Argoe christened at St Botolphs without Aldgate, London, on April 28th 1605, Johannes Argo, the son of Phillipi and Mariam Argo, on August 14th 1664, and William Argent of St Margarets, Westminster, on July 7th 1686. Maria Hargie was recorded in Stepney on September 8th 1859 and again on April 13th 1864 when the spelling had changed to Harrgie! It is interesting to note that Robert Hargerie of York, married his wife Elizabeth (Auston) during the Great Siege of the city, by the forces of Parliament, from April to July 2nd 1644. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Geoffrey Argent, which was dated 1180, the pipe rolls of the county of Northampton, during the reign of King Henry 11, known as 'The church builder', 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
116
Argue, James H
Argue, James H
 
 
117
Armitage Family Crest
Armitage Family Crest
Recorded in a number of spellings including Armitage, Armytage, Armatidge, Hermitage and others, this is an Anglo-French surname. It derives from the Old French word "hermite", from the Greek "eremos", meaning solitary, and was originally given either as a topographical name to someone who lived by a hermitage, or a place of learning, or as a locational name from any of the places named with the above word. These places include Hermitage in Durham, Northumberland, Dorset, Berkshire and Sussex, and Armitage in Staffordshire. Early examples of the surname include: Hugh del Hermytage (Warwickshire, 1296); Willelmus del Ermytache (Yorkshire, 1379); and John de Armitage (Sheffield, Yorkshire, 1423). In April 1596, William Armitage, rector of Billingford, Norfolk, was noted in Ecclesiastical Records of that county. Most name bearers can apparently be traced back to a family living at Armitage Bridge, near Huddersfield, in West Yorkshire, in the 13th Century, and it is in Yorkshire that the name is still most widespread. Early settlers in North America include; Henry Armitage, who left the Barbados Islands on the ship "Society" bound for Boston in March 1678, and Enoch Armitage of Wooldale, Yorkshire, who settled in America after 1677. The family Coat of Arms is red with a lion's head erased between three silver cross crosslets. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Richard de Ermitage, which was dated 1259, witness, in the "Assize Court Rolls of Cheshire", during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
118
Armstrong Family Crest
Armstrong Family Crest
After William 1 conquered England in 1066, he rewarded his followers with land grants. Amongst these followers were ones known as "Forten Bras" which literally translates as "strong in the arm", itself a rare surname, and from these people developed the Armstrangs or Armstrongs. The clan has always been centred in Liddesdale in Cumbria, where its fierce and warlike members were enlisted by the Scottish and English kings in turn. The terms "Moss Troopers" and "Border Reivers" were applied to the clan Armstrong, the history of the clan being the history of "The Border" and the wars between England and Scotland. As examples of their "strength", in 1342, Richard Harmestrang made a loan to King David 11 (1329 - 1371) of Scotland, whilst in 1363, William Armstrong was not only steward to the king, but ambassador to England. However, it is in the field of (literally) private enterprise that the Armstrongs made their mark, Armstrong of Gilnockie, a well known "free booter", being executed by James V of Scotland in 1529, whilst in 1596, Kinmont Willie (Armstrong), another "pirate" was seized by the Scots from Carlisle Castle, his subsequent fate is "unknown". Another unfortunate was Sir Thomas Armstrong (1624 - 1684), a well known monarchist, who fell foul of Judge Jeffreys and was executed. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Adam Armstrong, which was dated 1235, arrested and imprisoned for murder and later pardoned at Carlisle, during the reign of King Alexander 11 of Scotland, 1214 - 1249. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling 
 
119
Armstrong, Charles 1830
Armstrong, Charles 1830
 
 
120
Armstrong, Charles 1840
Armstrong, Charles 1840
 
 
121
Armstrong, Charles 1850
Armstrong, Charles 1850
 
 
122
Armstrong, Elizabeth Grave Stone
Armstrong, Elizabeth Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
123
Armstrong, Harry Robert World War I page 1
Armstrong, Harry Robert World War I page 1
 
 
124
Armstrong, Harry Robert World War I page 2
Armstrong, Harry Robert World War I page 2
 
 
125
Armstrong, Helen Louisa Birth Record
Armstrong, Helen Louisa Birth Record
 
 
126
Armstrong, John Chessar
Armstrong, John Chessar
 
 
127
Armstrong, John Chessar Birth Record
Armstrong, John Chessar Birth Record
 
 
128
Armstrong, Margaret and James Douglas Harnett Grave Stone
Armstrong, Margaret and James Douglas Harnett Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
129
Arnold ll
Arnold ll
 
 
130
Arnold, Clara Etty Birth Record
Arnold, Clara Etty Birth Record
 
 
131
Arnott, John Thompson 1901
Arnott, John Thompson 1901
 
 
132
Arnott, William 1851
Arnott, William 1851
 
 
133
Arnott, William 1861 Census
Arnott, William 1861 Census
 
 
134
Arnott, William and Family on 1871 Census
Arnott, William and Family on 1871 Census
 
 
135
Arnott, William and Family on 1891 Census
Arnott, William and Family on 1891 Census
 
 
136
Ash, Carl George 1910
Ash, Carl George 1910
 
 
137
Ash, Carl George 1920
Ash, Carl George 1920
 
 
138
Ash, Carl George 1930
Ash, Carl George 1930
 
 
139
Ashmore Family Crest
Ashmore Family Crest
This interesting surname is of English locational origin from a place so called in Dorset. The placename was recorded as "Aisemare" in the Domesday Book of 1086, and derives from either the Old English pre 7th Century "aesc" meaning ash plus "mere" a lake; hence "lake where ash-trees grow" or as the place is on the Wiltshire border it may be from the Old English personal name "Aesca" plus "(ge)maere" a boundary; hence "Aesca's boundary". The surname may also be from any of several minor places composed of the Old English elements "aesc" ash plus "mor" a marsh or fen. In the modern idiom the surname has many variant spellings including Ashemore, Asmore, Ashmoore, Ashmere, etc.. On July 19th 1562, John, son of John Ashmore, was christened at St. Michael's, Cornhill, and Elizabeth daughter of Roger Ashmore was christened on October 20th 1596, at St. Dunstans, Stepney. One of the earliest settlers in the New World was Anthony Ashmore aged 33, who departed from the Port of London, aboard the "Expedition", bound for the Barbados on November 20th 1635. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of John Ashemore, witness at christening, which was dated May 11th 1561, St. Michael, Cornhill, London, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth 1, "Good Queen Bess", 1558 - 1603. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
140
Asselstine, Herbert Bruce Birth Record
Asselstine, Herbert Bruce Birth Record
 
 
141
Asselstine, Herbert Bruce Birth Record.jpg
Asselstine, Herbert Bruce Birth Record.jpg
 
 
142
Asselstine, Herbert Bruce Herbert James and William Oscar.jpg
Asselstine, Herbert Bruce Herbert James and William Oscar.jpg
 
 
143
Assheton Family Crest
Assheton Family Crest
An old Lancashire family, originally seated at Assheton-under-Lyne, unde nomen. From them proceeded two lines of baronets, and the Asshetons of Downham. Shirley's Noble and Gentle Men. 
 
144
Astleford, Cecil W Birth Record
Astleford, Cecil W Birth Record
 
 
145
Astleford, Cecil W Grave Stone
Astleford, Cecil W Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
146
Astleford, Cecil Wyman
Astleford, Cecil Wyman
 
 
147
Astleford, Cecil Wyman 2
Astleford, Cecil Wyman 2
 
 
148
Astleford, Cecil Wyman Birth Record
Astleford, Cecil Wyman Birth Record
 
 
149
Astleford, Cecil Wyman Draft Registration Card World War 11
Astleford, Cecil Wyman Draft Registration Card World War 11
 
 
150
Astleford, Cecil Wyman Draft Registration Card World War I
Astleford, Cecil Wyman Draft Registration Card World War I
 
 

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