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201
Bache, Alexander Dallas
Bache, Alexander Dallas
 
 
202
Bache, Richard
Bache, Richard
 
 
203
Baggilegh Coat of Arms
Baggilegh Coat of Arms
This surname is derived from a geographical locality. 'of Baguley,' a township near Northenden, Cheshire The Manchester Directory has Bagoley and Baggoley; v. Bagley.

Henry de Bageleg, Salop and Staffordshire, Henry III-Edward I: Testa de Nevill, sive Liber Feodorum, temp.
 
 
204
Bailey Family Crest
Bailey Family Crest
This most interesting surname has three distinct origins. Firstly it can be an occupational name for a steward or official from the Old French "baillis" or "bailif", and middle English "bail(l)". The word survives in Scotland as "bailie", the title of a municipal magistrate, but in England has developed into "bailiff", an officer of the court. The second source is topographical, denoting one who lived by the outermost wall of a castle or fortified town from the middle English "bail(l)y" as can be seen in the case of the Old Bailey in London which was part of the early medieval walls. Thirdly, the surname can be locational, from "Bailey", in Lancashire which means "berry wood". One Roger le Baylly appeared in the Suffolk Pipe Rolls in 1230, while the Assize Court Rolls of Lancashire recorded a Ralph de Baylegh in 1246. Walter Bayley (1529-1593) educated at Winchester and fellow of Oxford, was Queen Elizabeth's physician. One William Butterworth Bayley (1782-1860) an Anglo-Indian, was educated at Eton and rose to the rank of Governor-general of India (1828-1830), he later became a director of the East India Company. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Roger le Baylly, which was dated 1230, in the Suffolk Pipe Rolls, during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "the Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling 
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205
Bailey, Ella Edna 1920 Census
Bailey, Ella Edna 1920 Census
 
 
206
Bailey, Ella Edna and CHarles Henry Glenn
Bailey, Ella Edna and CHarles Henry Glenn
 
 
207
Bailey, Ella Edna Grave Stone
Bailey, Ella Edna Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
208
Bailey, Ella Edna with Charles Henry and Lavon William Glenn
Bailey, Ella Edna with Charles Henry and Lavon William Glenn
 
 
209
Bailey, Jean US City Directories Lyle Hiatt
Bailey, Jean US City Directories Lyle Hiatt
 
 
210
Bailey, Mary L and Francis T OKeeffe Marriage Record
Bailey, Mary L and Francis T OKeeffe Marriage Record
 
 
211
Bailey, Theresa M
Bailey, Theresa M
 
 
212
Bailey, Wilber H 1900
Bailey, Wilber H 1900
 
 
213
Bailey, Wilbur H and Eleanor Greenfield Cox Marriage Record
Bailey, Wilbur H and Eleanor Greenfield Cox Marriage Record
 
 
214
Bailey, Wilbur H World War II
Bailey, Wilbur H World War II
 
 
215
Bailey, Wilbur H. 1930
Bailey, Wilbur H. 1930
 
 
216
Bailey, Willam Henderson Grave Stone
Bailey, Willam Henderson Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
217
Bailey, William H Civil War Pension Card
Bailey, William H Civil War Pension Card
 
 
218
Bailey, William H Headstone Applicaton
Bailey, William H Headstone Applicaton
 
 
219
Bailey, William Henderson 1890
Bailey, William Henderson 1890
 
 
220
Baker Famiy Crest
Baker Famiy Crest
This ancient surname is of Olde English pre 8th century origins deriving from the word 'boeccure'. The surname is always occupational, but not always for a maker1 of bread. There are a number of possible origins and these include an official with special responsibilities for the baking ovens in a monastery or castle, as well as the keeper of the 'communal kitchen' in a town or village, since most of the humbler households had no cooking facilities other than a pot over a fire. The right to be in charge of this service and to exact money or loaves in return for its use, was in many parts of Britain, a hereditary feudal privilege. Less often the surname may have been acquired by someone noted for specifically baking fine bread or as an owner of a kiln for the baking of pottery or even bricks. The surname is first recorded in the late 12th Century, and early recordings include such examples as Robert Bakere, a witness in the Assize Court Rolls of Lancashire for the year 1246, and Walter le Backere in the rolls of the county of Hampshire for 1280 a.d. The female form of the name is 'Baxter'. There have been no less than forty two 'Baker' entries in the "Dictionary of National Biography", and during the latter half of the 19th century the name was arguably the most famous in the country. This was owing to the exploits of Sir Samuel Baker, who with Stanley and Livingstone, was the greatest African explorer, and his brother, Valentine Baker, the famous Cavalry leader, known world wide as 'Baker Pasha'. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William le Bakere, which was dated 1177, in the "Pipe Rolls of Norfolk", during the reign of King Henry 11, known as "The Builder of Churches", 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
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221
Baker, Barnabas Grave Stone
Baker, Barnabas Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
222
Baker, Bertha Agnes
Baker, Bertha Agnes
 
 
223
Baker, Eliphalet Grave Stone
Baker, Eliphalet Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
224
Baker, Elizabeth 1841 Census
Baker, Elizabeth 1841 Census
 
 
225
Baker, Elizabeth 1851
Baker, Elizabeth 1851
 
 
226
Baker, Elizabeth 1861 Census
Baker, Elizabeth 1861 Census
 
 
227
Baker, Elizabeth 1871
Baker, Elizabeth 1871
 
 
228
Baker, Elizabeth Death Record.jpg
Baker, Elizabeth Death Record.jpg
 
 
229
Baker, Gustavus Swartz
Baker, Gustavus Swartz
 
 
230
Baker, Henry F Upper Canada Land Petitions recommended for 200 acres
Baker, Henry F Upper Canada Land Petitions recommended for 200 acres
 
 
231
Baker, Judah Grave Stone
Baker, Judah Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
232
Bakewell Famly Crest
Bakewell Famly Crest
This is an English locational surname. It originates from the town of Bakewell in the county of Derbyshire, a place first recorded in the year 924 a.d. in the famous rolls known as the 'Anglo-Saxon Chronicles', perhaps the first 'newpaper' ever produced. The place name recording was as 'Badecan wiella', or the springs of Badeca. The latter was a tribal name, which may have originally been associated with (Queen) Boadicea, or it may have been the name of a local chief or landowner. The surname is however much later. Being locational it may have developed from an early land owning family, there was a family called the Bakewell's of Bakewell, although for some name holders at least it may be a 'from' name. This is to say that it was a surname given to the people after the left Bakewell and moved elsewhere. In the small communities of the later Middle Ages, the easiest way to identify a stranger was to call him, or sometimes her, by the name of the place from whence they came. Spelling being problematical, and local dialects very thick, often lead to the development of 'sounds like' spellings. Bakewell seems to have largely avoided this fate. The first known recording of the surname is that of Sir John de Bakwell in the famous surviving Parliamentary Rolls of King Edward 11nd, and dated about 1308. Sir John is given as being 'from Middlesex'. It is possible that he was the M P for Bakewell. Later nameholders of some stature include Robert Bakewell of Leicestershire (1725 - 1795), who was famous for his skills in improving the breeding of cattle, whilst another Robert Bakewell (1768 - 1843) was one of the first successful geologists. 
 
233
Bakewell, Lenora Ann and Trevor Gregory Marriage Notice
Bakewell, Lenora Ann and Trevor Gregory Marriage Notice
 
 
234
Bakewell, Michael William Birth Notice
(At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.) 
 
235
Bakewell, Sam
Bakewell, Sam
 
 
236
Balckaby, Hannah and Samuel Knapp Grave Stone
Balckaby, Hannah and Samuel Knapp Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
237
Balderston, A. Stanford 1880
Balderston, A. Stanford 1880
 
 
238
Baldington Family Crest
Baldington Family Crest
 
 
239
Baldwin Family Crest
Baldwin Family Crest
This ancient and distinguished name is of Anglo-Saxon and Old German origin; it is a hereditary surname developed from the male personal name Baldwin, which was popular in England before and after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The given name derives from the Olde English "Bealdwine", and the cognate Old German "Baldwine", composed of the elements "b(e)ald", bold, brave, and "wine", friend, and is recorded as "Baldewyne", circa 1066, and as "Balduin, Baldewin" in the Domesday Book of 1086. This name was a favourite among the Normans and in Flanders in the early Middle Ages, and it was probably the Flemish influence which was responsible for its popularity in England in the 12th and 13th Centuries. Baldwin was the given name of the Crusader who in 1100 became the first Christian king of Jerusalem, and of the Count of Flanders (1172 - 1205), who led the Fourth Crusade and became the first Latin Emperor of Constantinople (1204). Among the notable bearers of the surname is John Baldwin (died 1545), judge at the trials of Bishop Fisher, Sir Thomas More, and Anne Boleyn. One Thomas Baldwin was an early settler in the American Colonies, being listed in a "List of the Living in Virginia" compiled on February 16th 1623. A Coat of Arms granted to a family of the name depicts a gold griffin segreant on a red shield; the Crest is a blue lion rampant holding in the paws a gold cross crosslet fitchee. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Stephen Baldewin, which was dated 1200, in the "Pipe Rolls of Hampshire", during the reign of King John, known as "Lackland", 1199 - 1216. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
240
Baldwin IV
Baldwin IV
 
 
241
Baldwin V
Baldwin V
 
 
242
Baldwin V of Flanders and Adela of France.jpg
Baldwin V of Flanders and Adela of France.jpg
 
 
243
Baldwin, John Sir Dictionary of National Biography Volumes 1-20, 22
Baldwin, John Sir Dictionary of National Biography Volumes 1-20, 22
 
 
244
Baldwin, John Sir Trail of Anne
Baldwin, John Sir Trail of Anne
 
 
245
Baldwin, Timothy Grave Stone
Baldwin, Timothy Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
246
Balfour, John Baird Death Record
Balfour, John Baird Death Record
 
 
247
Ball, George Irene Hulda Thelma Goron Otto and Marcus Lindsley and Maude Opdyke Grave Stone
Ball, George Irene Hulda Thelma Goron Otto and Marcus Lindsley and Maude Opdyke Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
248
Ball, George Louis Gustine
Ball, George Louis Gustine
 
 
249
Ball, George Washington Grave Stone
Ball, George Washington Grave Stone
Status: Located;  
 
250
Ball, Mary Genevive
Ball, Mary Genevive
 
 

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