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101
Corrin Family Crest
Corrin Family Crest
This interesting name is one of the Anglicized forms of the Gaelic (Irish) "O'Corraidhin", meaning "descendant of Corraidhin", a personal name from a diminutive form of the byname derived from "corradh", spear. The surname Corrin is numerous and widespread in Ireland now, both in its Anglicized forms and in the Irish forms of O'Corrain or O'Currain. In the 16th and 17th Centuries, the name was found mainly in counties Waterford and Tipperary, and also in Galway and Leitrim. In Kerry, the name was usually found as Currane, and other variants in the modern idiom include, Corran, Curreen and Curren. One Andrew O'Curran, O.S.B., was appointed Prior of Glascarrig in 1411, after an interesting case of dispensation by the Pope. On July 14th 1755, Elizabeth Corrin married James Haselden at St. Nicholas, Liverpool. The marriage of Elizabeth Corrin and John Lace took place on October 18th 1783, at St. Anne's, Soho, Westminster, London. Mary Ann, daughter of John and Ellen Corrin was christened on May 19th 1786 at St. Nicholas, Liverpool. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Simon O'Currin, which was dated 1300, Bishop of Kilfenora, during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Cowan Family Crest
Cowan Family Crest

This interesting name, widespread in Scotland and Ulster, is an Anglicized form of the old Gaelic MacEoghain or MacEoin. The Gaelic prefix "mac" means "son of", plus the personal name Eoghan from the old Celtic "Oue(i)n", well-born, but believed to derive ultimately from the Greek "Eugenious", "born lucky" or "well-born". In Ireland Eugene replaced Eoin, the old Irish form of John, and the various patronymic forms of the name include MacOwen, MacCown, MacCone, MacKeown. The forms Cowan, Cowen and Kewon resulted from the subsequent loss of the "Mac" prefix. In 1582 one, John Cowan was Chancellor of Christ church, Waterford, and in 1639 Cowan's Hospital in Stirling was founded by John Cowan, a merchant there. On June 29th 1643 Marionne Cowan and George Mwir were married in Ochiltree, Ayrshire. On May 8th 1846 Pat Cowan, a merchant, aged 21 yrs., embarked from Liverpool on the "Rochester" bound for New York. He was a famine immigrant to that city. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Elizabeth Cowan, (marriage to Edward Humphery), which was dated November 12th 1580, London, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth 1, known as "Good Queen Bess", 1558 - 1603. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling 
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Cranstoun Family Crest
Cranstoun Family Crest
This interesting surname is of Scottish origin, and is a variant spelling of a locational name Cranston, from lands or barony of this name in Midlothian, Scotland. The derivation is from the Old English pre 7th Century 'cran', a crane, and 'tun', an enclosure, or settlement. The following examples illustrate the name development after 1190 (see below), Thomas de Cranystoun (circa 1214, East Lothian), Andrew de Cragestone (1296, Edinburghshire), whose seal bears a crane and the words: 'S' Andree de Cranist', Andrew de Cranstoun (1338), Thomas de Cranstoun, was provost of Edinburgh in 1423, and William of Cranstoun was one of the conservators of the truce between Scotland and England, in 1451. An early Cranston motto reads 'Thou shall want ere I want'. Among the early sample recordings in Midlothian are the christening of Robert Cranstoun on March 28th 1620, and of Thomas Cranstoun on June 29th 1620, at Edinburgh Parish. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Elfric de Cranston, which was dated circa 1190, Holyrood, Scotland, during the reign of King William (The Lion) of Scotland, 1214 - 1249. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Croft Family Crest
Croft Family Crest
Recorded in many spellings as shown below, this is an English surname of pre 6th century origins. These included a nickname surname for a smart, cunning person, deriving from the pre 7th century word "craeft" meaning craft or skill. Secondly it may be topographical for someone who lived by a "croft". This described a piece of enclosed land used for tillage or pasture. Thirdly there are several places in England called Croft and the surname may equally be locational from any of them. As an example Croft village in Leicestershire was recorded as "Craeft" in the Saxon Chartulary of 836 a.d.. The word "craeft" means a machine, such as a wind mill or water mill. The surname is first recorded in the latter half of the 12th Century (see below), and modern spellings include Atcroft, Bycraft, Bycroft, Croft, Crofts, Crafts, Cruft and Crufts. Examples of recordings include Roger de Croft in the Curia Regis Rolls of Warwickshire in the year 1213, whilst on February 20th 1557, John Craft, was christened at the church of St. Martin Ludgate, in the city of London. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Aluric Craft. This was dated 1185, in the records of the Knight Templars of Essex, during the reign of King Henry 11nd, 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as the Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling 
 
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Crolius Family Crest
Crolius Family Crest
 
 
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Danvers Family Crest
Danvers Family Crest
 
 
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Darell Family Crest
Darell Family Crest
Recorded in various spellings including Darell, Darrel, Darrell, Dearl, Dearle, Derell, Derl, Durlle, and the more popular Durrell, this unusual surname is usually medieval English, but of Norman-French origins. It is locational from the place called "Airel" in the La Manche region of Normandy. The placename means "the courtyard", derived from the early Latin word "arealis", describing an open space and curiously is itself a derivative of the word "area", used in the original sense to mean a threshing floor. The surname is formed from by fusing the French preposition "de", meaning "of" to the place name of Airel. Presumably the surname was introduced into England after the Norman Conquest of the country in 1066, and over the centuries the surname development has included Dearle in Norfolk in 1563, Darrell in London in 1580, Dearell in Hampshire in 1585, and many others. Early examples of the surname recordings taken from surviving church registers of the diocese of Greater London include: Flora Durrell, a witness at St Johns Hackney, on November 11th 1623, the marriage of William Dearle to Ann Trafman at St. Mary le Bone, Marylebone, on May 20th 1677, and James Derl, the son of James and Maria Derl, who was christened at St Leonard's Shoreditch, on September 11th 1842. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William Darell. This was dated 1206, at Sessay, in North Yorkshire, during the reign of King John of England, 1199 - 1216. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Davenport Family Crest
Davenport Family Crest
This unusual surname recorded in the spellings of Davenport and Devenport, is of Anglo- Saxon origin, and is a locational name from 'Davenport' in Cheshire. Curiously 'Devonport' in Devon, does not seem to have produced surnames. Recorded as "Deneport" in the Domesday Book of 1086, and as "Devennport" in the 1130 charters of the Abbey of Durham, the place is so called from situation on the river Dane. The river name is an ancient British (pre-Roman) one, "Dauen" or "Daan", related to the Middle Welsh dafn", meaning "a trickling stream". The second element "port" derives from the Olde English pre 7th Century word for a harbour or wharf. This is ultimately from the Latin "portus", of the same meaning. Locational surnames were originally given to the lord of the manor, or as a means of identification to those who left their place of origin to settle elsewhere. Early examples of the surname include: Ormus de Davenport in the Cheshire rolls of 1166, and Richard de Daveneport in the Staffordshire charters of 1203. In 1555, one John Davenport, of Henbury, was noted in the Wills Records at Cheshire. A family of the name whose seat is still Capesthorne Hall, near Macclesfield, claim descent from Vivian de Davenport (deceased circa 1257). A Coat of Arms granted to the Davenport family of Davenport, descended from Ormus de Davenport (above), is a silver shield with a chevron between three black crosses crosslet fitchee, the Crest being a man's head, couped at the shoulders and side head proper with a golden rope around the neck. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Richard de Deveneport, which was dated 1162, in the "Pipe Rolls of Cheshire", during the reign of King Henry 11, known as "The Builder of Churches", 1154 - 1189. 
 
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Davison Famly Crest
Davison Famly Crest
This interesting surname is as patronymic from the male Hebrew given name David, from "Dodaveha" meaning "Beloved of Jehovah". This name was borne by the greatest of the early Kings of Israel which led to its popularity first among the Jews and later among Christians throughout Europe in the Middle Ages. St. David, the 6th Century Bishop of Menevia, became patron saint of Wales, and the name was borne by two Kings of Scotland (David 1, 1124 - 1153, and David 11, 1329 - 1371). One David Clericus, recorded in Documents relating to the Danelaw, Lincolnshire, dated 1150, is one of the earliest recorded bearers of the personal name in England. The surname was first recorded in the early half of the 14th Century (see below), and one John Davideson appears in "a Descriptive Catalogue of Ancient Deeds", Warwickshire (1350). In the modern idiom the surname has numerous variant spellings including Davidson, Davson, Davisson, and Davids. One George Davison married Jane Hinksley in 1599, at St. James, Clerkenwell, London. One of the earliest settlers in the New World was Alice Davison, who was recorded as living in James City, Virginia, on February 16th 1623. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Thomas Davyson, which was dated 1327, in the "Subsidy Rolls of Yorkshire", during the reign of King Edward 111, known as "The Father of the Navy", 1327 - 1377. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling 
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Davy Family Crest
Davy Family Crest
Recorded in the spellings of Davis, Davies, Davie, Davy, and others, this is a patronymic surname of Hebrew origins, and much associated with Wales. It means 'the son of David', from the Hebrew male given name meaning "beloved". The name is not recorded in any part of Britain before the Norman Conquest of 1066, and is regarded as being a 'Crusader' introduction. In the 12th century all the parts of Christendom joined in expeditions to free the Holy Land from the infidel. Although all the crusades were militarily unsuccessful, and have remained so to this day, the returning soldiers 'adopted' certain biblical and Greek names, of which David was one, and gave them to their children, particularly their sons. Amongst the very earliest recordings of the given name predating the surnames is that of 'Dauid clericus', (David, the clerk), in the rolls of the county of Lincoln for the year 1150, whilst Richard Davy appears in the Subsidy rolls of Worcester for the year 1275. Further examples include Thomas Dayson in the 1327 Pipe Rolls of Yorkshire, and Richard Davys is listed in the Register of the Freemen of the City of York for the year 1402. An interesting bearer of the name was Sir Thomas Davies (1631 - 1680), a bookseller, who became master of the Stationer's Guild in 1668 and was Lord Mayor of London in 1666, during the Great Fire of London. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of John Dauisse, which was dated 1327, in the Subsidy Rolls of the county of Cambridgeshire, during the reign of King Edward 111, known as "The Father of the Navy", 1327 - 1377. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.
 
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de Warren, John and Eleanor Gerrard Family Crest
de Warren, John and Eleanor Gerrard Family Crest
Recorded in the modern spellings of Warren and the much rarer Warran and Warron, this is an English surname, but one of medieval French origins, of which there are three. The first is locational from the village of La Varrenne in the departement of Seine-Maritime, and meaning the place on the sandy soil. The second topographical and describing someone who lived by a game park, whilst thirdly it may be occupational for someone employed in such a place. If so the derivation is from the Norman French word "warrene", meaning a warren or land set aside for breeding game. Introduced into England and Scotland after the Conquest of 1066, the surname is one of the earliest on record as shown below. Early examples of recordings include William de Warren in the Hundred Rolls of Norfolk in 1273, and William de Warenne, in the tax registers known as the Feet of Fines for the county of Essex in 1285. Recordings from surviving church registers include the marriage of William Waron and Alys Agno on May 13th 1542, at St. Margaret's Westminster, and the marriage of William Warren and Elizabeth Bullwack on January 25th 1544, at St. Martin Orgar in the city of London. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William de Warenne. This was dated 1086, in the Domesday Book for London, during the reign of King William 1st of England, and known as "The Conqueror", 1066 - 1087. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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de Warren, Laurence and Margaret Legh Family Crest
de Warren, Laurence and Margaret Legh Family Crest
Recorded in the modern spellings of Warren and the much rarer Warran and Warron, this is an English surname, but one of medieval French origins, of which there are three. The first is locational from the village of La Varrenne in the departement of Seine-Maritime, and meaning the place on the sandy soil. The second topographical and describing someone who lived by a game park, whilst thirdly it may be occupational for someone employed in such a place. If so the derivation is from the Norman French word "warrene", meaning a warren or land set aside for breeding game. Introduced into England and Scotland after the Conquest of 1066, the surname is one of the earliest on record as shown below. Early examples of recordings include William de Warren in the Hundred Rolls of Norfolk in 1273, and William de Warenne, in the tax registers known as the Feet of Fines for the county of Essex in 1285. Recordings from surviving church registers include the marriage of William Waron and Alys Agno on May 13th 1542, at St. Margaret's Westminster, and the marriage of William Warren and Elizabeth Bullwack on January 25th 1544, at St. Martin Orgar in the city of London. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William de Warenne. This was dated 1086, in the Domesday Book for London, during the reign of King William 1st of England, and known as "The Conqueror", 1066 - 1087. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.
 
 
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Deacon Family Crest
Deacon Family Crest
 
 
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Dean Family Crest
Dean Family Crest
Recorded in several spelling forms including Deacon, Deecon, Deason, Deeson, Deasin, Deakin and Deakins, this interesting surname is Anglo-Scottish. It is or rather was at least in England an occupational name for a deacon, or perhaps for his servant. The derivation is from the Old English pre 7th century word "deakne", although ultimately the origin is from the late Latin word "diaconus" or the Ancient Greek "diakonos", meaning a friend or manservant. In the Catholic church a deacon is one ranking below an ordained minister, but in Scotland it very secular, being the president of an incorporated trade or body of craftsmen in a burgh. The surname is first recorded in the early 13th Century, with Richard le Deken, appearing in the Assize Court Rolls of Bedfordshire in 1247, Walter Dekne, a burgess of Perth, being granted safe conduct into England in 1291, and John Dekne, appearing in the Subsidy Rolls of Sussex in 1327. Later recordings include those of William Deakin and Ann Slatt who were married at St. Margarets, Westminster, on January 17th 1677. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Richard le Diakne. This was dated 1212, in the Pipe Rolls of Suffolk, during the reign of King John of England, 1199 - 1216. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling 
 
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Deane Family Crest
Deane Family Crest
This ancient name is chiefly of Anglo-Saxon origin, derived from the Olde English pre 7th Century "denu", valley, in Middle English "dene". The surname from this source may be either locational or topographical in origin; if the former, it derives from any one of the places named with this term, in, for example, Devonshire, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Lancashire and Sussex. Most of these places are recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as "Dene". As a topographical surname, Dean(e) was used to denote esidence in or near a valley, as in the following early examples of the name: William de la Dena (1193, Surrey); Simon in la Dene (1271, Somerset); and William atte Dene (1296, Sussex). The second possible derivation of the name is from the Old French "deien, dien", dean (a term ultimately from the Latin "decanus", "leader of ten men"), introduced into England after the Norman Conquest of 1066 and borrowed into Middle English as "deen". This was used as a nickname for someone thought to resemble a dean in behaviour, or as an occupational name for a servant of a dean; Geoffrey le Dean is recorded in Yorkshire in 1278. In London, the marriage of Thomas Deane and Katherin Marchant was recorded at St. Dunstan in the East, on July 22nd 1568. A Coat of Arms granted to a family of the name depicts, on a blue shield, a red annulet on a gold bend. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Ralph de Dene, which was dated 1086, in the Domesday Book of Sussex, during the reign of King William 1, known as "William the Conqueror", 1066 - 1087. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Dennison Family Crest
Dennison Family Crest
This English and sometimes Scottish surname is of Ancient Greek origins. It derives from the medieval given name Dennis, itself coming from the Greek Dionysios meaning "the divine one of Nysa". Better known as Bacchus, this god was protector of the vine. Nysa was a mountain in the modern Afghanistan where celebrations were held in the god's honour by the Greek army. The name was recorded as Dionisius in documents relating to the Danelaw, circa 1100, and Denis de Sixlea appears in the 1176 "Pipe Rolls" of Lincolnshire. The surname is first recorded in the latter half of the 13th Century, (see below). St. Dionysius or Denis of Paris, martyred on Montmartre circa 255, was largely responsible for the popularity of the name in France from whence it spread to England. John Dennison, the son of Richard and Margaret Dennison was christened on August 24th 1636, at St Dunstas in the East, Stepney, London. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Walter Denys, witness, which was dated 1272, in the Assize Court Rolls of Staffordshire, during the reign of King Henry 111, 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Digby Family Crest
Digby Family Crest
This interesting and unusual surname is of Anglo-Saxon and Scandinavian origin, and is habitational from a minor place so called in Lincolnshire, derived from the Middle English (1200 - 1500) "diche, dike", from the Olde English pre 7th Century "dic", dyke, earthwork, and the Old Norse "byr", farm, settlement; the medieval dyke was larger and more prominent than the modern ditch, and was usually constructed for urposes of defence rather than drainage. The placename was first recorded as "Dicbi" in the Domesday Book of 1086, and as "Diggebi" in the Pipe Rolls of 1197. The surname was first recorded in the mid 12th Century and early recordings include; Geoffrey de Dyggeby in the 1250 Feet of Fines of Lincolnshire; and Simon Digby in the 1497 Feet of Fines of Warwickshire. An interesting namebearer, recorded in the "Dictionary of National Biography", was Sir Everard Digby (1578 - 1606), a Gunpowder Plot conspirator, who was converted to Catholicism at court by John Gerard in 1599, and knighted in 1603. He was detailed to incite a rising in the Midlands at the time of the Gunpowder Plot in 1605, but deserted his companions when besieged in Holbeach House, Staffordshire, on November 8th 1605, and was executed in 1606. A Coat of Arms granted to the family is azure a fleur-de-lis silver and a canton gold, the Crest being an ostrich silver holding in the beak a horseshoe proper. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Roger de Digby, which was dated circa 1160 - 1165, in the "Registrum Antiquissimum", during the reign of King Henry 11, known as "The Builder of Churches", Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.1154 - 1189. 
 
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Dineley Family Crest
Dineley Family Crest
 
 
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Dormer Family Crest
Dormer Family Crest
This unusual surname is of English medieval origins, although its derivation is French, and much earlier and probably pre 7th century. It derives from the word "dormeur" meaning "sleeper", and was introduced into England after the 1066 Norman-French invasion. It is or was a nickname for a heavy sleeper, or perhaps given the ribald humour of the medieval period, the reverse! We have not been able to identify any Chaucerian comments about "dormers" but no doubt there would have been some. Over 15% of British surnames are definately forms of nickname, indeed there are some researchers who are of the opinion that most surnames were at their creation, nicknames. The famous Victorian etymologist Canon Charles Bardsley also suggested that the name could be locational and derive from a place called Dormire, "mire" being a popular name suffix in the North of England, whilst "Dor" could refer to a river. He quotes that a Willelmus Dormire and an Agnes Dormire were recorded in the 1379 Poll Tax Rolls for Yorkshire, but he was unable to identify any place such as Dormire, and it seems likely that this was a localised spelling of Dormer/Dormour.The earliest known recording of the surname is probably that of Geoffrey Dormour, in the 1324 Subsidy Rolls for the county of Sussex. This was in the reign of King Edward 11nd of England, known as "Edward of Caernafon", 1307 - 1327. 
 
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Drakes Family Crest
Drakes Family Crest
This unusual and interesting name has two possible origins, the first and most generally applicable being of Anglo-Saxon origin, from the Olde English pre 7th Century byname or nickname "Draca", meaning "dragon" or "snake", in Middle English "Drake", Old Norse "Draki". The derivation for all these forms is from the Latin "draco", snake, or monster. As a nickname, it would presumably apply to someone formidable and fierce in battle, but it could also be a metonymic "occupational" surname for a standard-bearer, as in "Draker" (1260, Cambridgeshire). "Draca" was used in medieval England to mean a battle-standard as well as a dragon. The name may also be from the Middle English "drake" male of the duck. Sir Francis Drake (1540 - 1596) is perhaps the most famous name-bearer, defeating the Spanish Armada in 1588. A Coat of Arms granted to the family is a silver shield with a red wyvern, wings displayed and tail nowed, the Crest being a dexter arm erect couped at the elbow proper holding a black battle-axe. The Motto, "Aquila non captat muscas", translates as, "The eagle catcheth not flies". The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Leuing Drache, which was dated 1086, in the Domesday Book of Hampshire, during the reign of King William 1, known as "The Conqueror", 1066 - 1087. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling 
 
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Ducharme Family Crest
Ducharme Family Crest
 
 
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Duke of Aquitaine Coat of Arms
Duke of Aquitaine Coat of Arms
 
 
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Dutton Family Crest
Dutton Family Crest
This is an English locational name from either of the places so called in Cheshire or Lancashire. Dutton in Cheshire is first recorded as "Duntune" in the Domesday Book of 1086 and that in Lancashire as "Dotona" in 1102. They share the same derivation and meaning, which is "Dudda's village" or "settlement", derived from the Old English pre 7th Century personal name "Dudd(a)" with "tun", an enclosure, settlement or village, later a town. The family of Dutton whose ancestor is recorded below have been established at Dutton in Cheshire since the 11th Century. Hugh de Dutton was lord of the manor during the reign of Henry 11 (1154 - 1189). The marriage of Thomas Dutton and Judith Jennings is recorded in London in 1579. Among the recordings in Lancashire is the marriage of Edmund Dutton and Alice Teeller on February 2nd 1643 at Warrington. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Odard de Dutton, which was dated 1086, The Domesday Book, Cheshire, during the reign of King William 1, "The Conqueror", 1066 - 1087. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Eaton Family Tree
Eaton Family Tree
This interesting name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational surname deriving from any one of the numerous places called Eaton found in most of the midland and north-midland counties of England. Most of these places are named with the Olde English pre 7th Century "ea", river, with "tun", enclosure, settlement, and are variously recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as "Etone", "Etune", "Ettuna", and "Ettone". The other places called Eaton are named with the Olde English "eg", island, low-lying land, with "tun", as before, and are mostly recorded in the Domesday Book as "Eitone" and "Eitune". The modern surname has two main forms, Eaton and Eyton. Among the recordings of the name in London are those of the christening of John Eaton, at St. Lawrence Jewry, on January 20th 1566, and the marriage of Edward Eaton and Clemence Jordan at St. Mary's, Woodchurch, on October 15th 1570. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Peter de Eton, which was dated 1273, in the "Hundred Rolls of Huntingdonshire", during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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English Family Crest
English Family Crest
This interesting surname derives from the Olde English pre 7th Century "Englisc" meaning "English" and was originally given as a distinguishing name to an Angle as distinct from a Saxon. Both the Angles and Saxons were West German people who invaded England in the 5th and 6th Centuries A.D.. The Scottish form "Inglis" denotes an Englishman as opposed to a Scottish borderer whilst the form "English" referred to an Englishman living in Strathclyde. In the Welsh border counties the name would be given to an Englishman in a preponderatingly Welsh community. It may have been commonly used in the early Middle-Ages as a distinguishing epithet for an Anglo-Saxon in an area where the cultures were not predominantly English, for example in the Danelaw area, Scotland and parts of Wales, or as a distinguishing name after 1066 for a non-Norman in the regions of most intensive Norman settlement. However, at the present day the surname is fairly evenly distributed throughout the country. In the modern idiom, the name is found as Inglish, Inglis and English. On July 3rd 1560, Friswide English married Thomas Sheppard, at St. Mary Magdalene, Bermondsey, London, and William, son of Alexander English, was christened on September 7th 1567, at the same place. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Gillebertus Anglicus which was dated 1171, in the "Pipe Rolls of Herefordshire", during the reign of King Henry 11, known as "The Builder of Churches", 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Eton Family Crest
Eton Family Crest
Recorded in many surname spellings including Ayton, Eaton, Eton, Eyton, Iton, Iteen and apparently the extraordinary Eighteen, this interesting name is usually of Olde English and Anglo-Saxon pre 7th century origins. It is a locational surname deriving from any one of the numerous places called Eaton, Eton, and Ayton, found in several counties of England. Most of these places are named from the Olde English words "ea", meaning river, and "tun", a farm or settlement. They are variously recorded in the famous Domesday Book of 1086 in the spellings of Etone, Etune, Ettuna, and Ettone. It is therefore easy to see how the later surname spellings developed over the centuries. However there is also a probablity that at least some of the later surname spellings developed from the French name "Etienne" or "Estienne", forms of the personal name Stephen, and well recorded amongst the Huguenot protestant refugees of the 17th century. Examples of London recordings which may help to show the surname development include the christening of John Eaton, at St. Lawrence Jewry, on January 20th 1566, and the marriage of Edward Eton and Clemence Jordan at St. Mary Woolchurch, on October 15th 1570. Blais Etienne was recorded at the French Church, Threadneedle Street, on January 6th 1656, Charlotte Eteen at St Pancras Old Church, on February 24th 1844, and Henry Eighteen, at St Pauls, Deptford, on December 7th 1851. The first recorded spelling of the family name is believed to be that of Peter de Eton. This was dated 1273, in the "Hundred Rolls" of the county of Huntingdonshire", during the reign of King Edward 1st of England, 1272 - 1307
 
 
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Eversley Family Crest
Eversley Family Crest
Recorded in several spelling forms including Everleigh, Eveleigh, Everley, Eversley, and Everly, this is an English locational surname. It originates from either of the villages called Everley, in Wiltshire and Yorkshire, or Eversley parish in Hampshire, or possibly for some nameholders from a now 'lost' medieval village believed to have been in the West of England. The name is believed to translate as 'boars wood' from the Olde English pre 7th century 'eofor' meaning a boar, and 'leah', an enclosure in a forest used for agriculture. Like most locational surnames, this is a 'from' name. That is to say that the name was given as easy identification to people after they left their original homes and moved elsewhere. It is also a reason why most locational surnames are to be found recorded in several spellings. The first recording of the surname in any form is that of John de Eversele of Kent in the year 1273, whilst recordings from surviving church registers include: Anne Everlaye, on October 1st 1580 at St Olaves church, Hart Street, Marie Everlie at St Brides church, Fleet Street, and John Everlegh on June 10th 1753 at St Lukes, Old Street, all city of London. 
 
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Falaise Family Crest
Falaise Family Crest
Statistics and meaning of name Falaise
Usage: 4% firstname, 96% surname.
Falaise first name was found 20 times in 4 different countries.
Surname Falaise is used at least 454 times in at least 9 countries.
Name written with Chinese letters: ??? (pinyin: f? lái z?) 
 
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Farrer Family Crest
Farrer Family Crest

This interesting and unusual surname, with variant spellings Farrar, Farrer, Farra, Farrah, Pharro, Pharoah, etc., derives from the Medieval English and Old French terms "ferreor" and "ferour", derivatives of "fer", iron, from the Latin "ferrum", and was originally given as an occupational name to a worker in iron. The surname first appears on record in the latter part of the 13th Century, (see below), and is most widespread in Yorkshire as the following recordings indicate: Willilmus ferour and Hugo Farrour - the 1379 "Poll Tax Returns of Yorkshire" and magister doctor Pharor - "Register of the Corpus Christi Guild", York, dated 1517-1518. Recordings of the surname showing the initial "Ph-" for "F" include the christening of Robert, son of Edward Pharoe in St. Dunstan's, Stepney, London, on October 18th 1607; the christening of Benjamin, son of Ellis Pharaoh, in St. Martin in the Fields, Westminster, on April 29th 1694, and the christening of Ambrace, son of Thomas Pharoah in Farnham, Surrey, on November 6th 1816. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Thomas le Ferrur, which was dated 1275, in the "Close Rolls of Yorkshire", during the reign of Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Ferguson Family Crest
Ferguson Family Crest
This most interesting surname is of Old Gaelic origin, found in Ireland and Scotland, and is a patronymic form of "Fergus", from an Old Gaelic personal name "Fearghus", composed of the elements "fear", man, and "gus", vigour, force, with the patronymic ending "son". This Gaelic personal name was the name of an early Irish mythological figure, a valiant warrior, and was also the name of the grandfather of St. Columba. Ferguson is by far the most popular and widespread form of Fergus. Some Irish bearers f the name "Fergus" claim descent from Fergus, Prince of Galloway (deceased 1161). Ferguson is widespread in Ireland in Ulster, where it is of Scottish descent. The surname is first recorded in Scotland in the mid 15th Century (see below), where the Fergus(s)ons are classed among the septs of Mar and Atholl, according to the Acts of the parliaments of Scotland, 1124 - 1707. King Robert 1, Ruler of Scotland (1306 - 1329) granted certain lands in Ayrshire to Fergus, son of Fergus. James Ferguson (1710 - 1776) presented to the Royal Society (1763) a projection of the partial solar eclipse of 1764 and lectured on electricity. Patrick Ferguson (1744 - 1780) invented the first breech-loading rifle used in the British army. A Coat of Arms was granted to Major James Ferguson, in 1691, which depicts a silver buckle between three silver boars' heads couped, within a silver embattled bordure, on a blue shield, with the Motto "Arte et Animo" (By skill and courage). The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of John Fergusson, which was dated 1466, in the "Scottish Records of Kilkerran", during the reign of King James 111 of Scotland (Stuart), 1460 - 1488. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Field Family Crest
Field Family Crest

This ancient of pre 7th century German origins and Anglo-Saxon origins, is recorded in over seventy spellings. These range from Feild, Feld, and Field, to Delafield, Veld, Van den Velde, Feldmann, and the various ornamental compounds such as Feldblum or Fieldstone. However spelt, the name is topographical for someone who lived or worked on land which had been cleared of forest, but not brought into arable cultivation. The derivation is from "feld", translating as pasture or open country, almost the opposite of the 20th century meaning.. The earliest recordings are to be found in England and Germany. These include Hugo de la Felde, in the Pipe Rolls of the county of Bedfordshire, England, in the year 1188, and Petrus im dem Velde, of Mengen, Germany, in 1216. Other recordings include Franz van de Velde, the bishop of Herzogbusch, Germany, in 1576, and Margarett Feilde, who married at the church of St. Martin Orgar, London, in 1586. Amongst the very first settlers to the new colony of Virgina, America, was James Feild. He arrived in the ship "Swan of London", in 1624.. The first recorded spelling of the family name anywhere in the world is believed to be that of Robert de Felde, which was dated 1185, in the list of Knights Templars, in the registers of the county of Gloucestershire, England. This was during the reign of King Henry 11nd, known as "The Builder of Churches", 1154 - 1189. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop", often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Fitton Family Crest
Fitton Family Crest
There are two possible origins of this interesting name. Firstly, it was a common medieval term "fitten" for lying, or deceit, and would have been used as a nickname. Secondly it could be a locational name from Fitton hall in Leverington, Cambridgeshire which probably gets its name from the Old Norse "fit", grassland on the bank of a river and the Old English pre 7th Century tun, a settlement. In St. Margaret's, Lothbury, London one Benjamin Fitton son of George Fitton was christened in 1584. A famous namebearer being Mary Fitton (flourished 1600), maid of honour to Queen Elizabeth. She was the daughter of Sir Edward Fitton and was most doubtfully identified with the "dark lady" of Shakespeare's sonnets. She was mistress of William Herbert, third earl of Pembroke, and married Captain W. Polwhele (1607) and Captain Lougher. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Richard Ffyton, which was dated 1188, The Chartulary of Whalley Abbey, Lancashire, during the reign of King Henry 11, "the Builder of Churches", 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Fitz Alured Family Crest
Fitz Alured Family Crest
 
 
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FitzAlan Family Crest
FitzAlan Family Crest


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This interesting name is of Celtic origin, and derives from a personal name of great antiquity. The name Alan, is thought to derive from the Gaelic "ailin", little rock, a diminutive of "ail", rock, and was introduced into England and later to Ireland by the Breton followers of William the Conqueror after 1066, among whom it was a very popular given name. One man in particular is credited with being the first of the name into England; Alan Fergeant, Count of Brittany and a companion of the Conqueror, and later first Earl of Richmond in Yorkshire. The personal name is recorded in its Latinized form of "Alanus" in the Domesday Book of 1086, although the surname is not recorded until the first half of the 13th Century (see below). The modern surname can be found in a variety of forms, including: Allen, Alen, Alleyn, Alleyne, Allain, Alan, Allan, Allin, Allon, Allans and FitzAlan. Recordings from London Church Registers include the christening of William Alleyne at St. Mary's, Whitechapel, on December 30th 1606. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Geoffrey Alein, which was dated 1234, in the "Feet of Fines of Cambridgeshire", during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Flanders Family Crest
Flanders Family Crest
 
 
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Forfar Family Crest
Forfar Family Crest
Of local origin from the royal burgh of Forfar in Angus Richard de Forfar witnessed a charter by Richard de Friuill to the Abbey of Arnbroath c. 1178—1180 (RAA., I, 90). Ranulf de Forfar was one of the witnesses to a charter by Malcolm, earl of Angus c. 1220 (ibid., p. 331). Roger de Forfar is mentioned c. 1256—64 (LAC., 135), and in 1259 Adam of Forfare was groom of Adam de Liberatione (APS., I, p. 98). John de Forfar was burgess of St. Andrews in 1418 (CMN., 28), and Abraham Forfar was "persewit" for his ferine in 1614 (Urie, p. 13). Wylie Forfayr witnessed resignation of a feu in Peebles, 1471 (Scots Lore, p. 52). John Forfar is recorded in Dunfermline, 1586 (Dunfermline), and Patrick Farfar was admitted burgess of Aberdeen, 1607 (NSCM., I, p. 103). Forfer 1616. 
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Foutain Family Crest
Foutain Family Crest
This interesting and unusual surname is of early medieval English origin, and is from a topographical name for someone who lived near a spring or well, derived from the Old French "fontane", from the Late Latin "fontana", a derivative of the classical Latin "fons". The word was introduced into England by the Normans after the Invasion of 1066. Topographical surnames were among the earliest created, since both natural and man-made features in the landscape provided easily recognisable distinguishing names in the small communities of the Middle Ages. However, the name could also be locational from a place in France, named either Fontaine, Fonteyne or Lafontaine, derived from the same element. Locational surnames were developed when former inhabitants of a place moved to another area, usually to seek work, and were best identified by the name of their birthplace. In this case the name was probably brought to England by one of the Norman invaders, who came from one of the places in France already mentioned. Jacob, son of Petter and Mary Fountain, was christened on December 6th 1648 at St. Gabriel's, Fenchurch, London. A Coat of Arms granted to a family in Essex on February 22nd 1619 is red a bend gold, in the sinister chief a cinquefoil silver. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Hugo de Funteines, which was dated 1202, in the "Pipe Rolls of Kent", during the reign of King John, known as "Lackland", 1199 - 1216. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
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Franklin Family Crest
Franklin Family Crest
This interesting old status name has its origins in the feudal system of medieval England. It derives from the Middle English "frankelin", from the Anglo-Norman French "franc" meaning free, in the sense of liberal and generous, plus the germanic suffix "ling". The status of the Franklin varied somewhat according to time and place in medieval England; in general, he was a free man and a holder of fairly extensive areas of land, a gentleman ranked above the main body of minor freeholders, but below a knight or a member of the nobility. The surname dates back to the late 12th Century, (see below). One, Luke le Franckeleyn is registered in the Cambridgeshire Feet of Fines (1234). In the modern idiom the name has six spelling variations, Frankling, Francklyn, Francklin, Franklen, Franklyn and Franklin. On February 11th 1560, George Franklin married Agnes Hills, at St. Dionis Backchurch, London. The American statesman and scientist Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), was of British descent. His father, a maker of soap and candles, had emigrated in about 1682, from Ecton, Northamptonshire, to Boston, where his son was born. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Ralph Frankelein, which was dated 1195, in the Pipe Rolls of Yorkshire, during the reign of King Richard 1, known as "The Lionheart", 1189 - 1199. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
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Fullwood Family Crest
Fullwood Family Crest
This is a Northern locational surname which derives from one of the places called 'Fullwood' in Lancashire and Yorkshire. The derivation is from the Old English pre 7th century 'ful' meaning dirty or foul, and wudu' - a wood. Presumably the original villages must have been on the edge of a swamp or at least standing water. In an age when hygiene was at best elementary, the woods really must have been foul! There is a suggestion that the name could mean 'the woods (containing) wild fowl', but this seems slightly illogical, in that in the days before the Norman Conquest of 1066, nine tenths of England were more or less covered by woodland in anycase. Nethertheless it is open to disagreement. What is certain is that the Lancashire village is recorded in the charter rolls of the county for the year 1228 as Fulewude, and again in 1252 but this time in the spelling of Fuluuode. The first recordings were in Yorkshire, as shown below. These include Ricardus de Folewode in the 1379 Poll Tax rolls, and Hugo de Fulwode in the same register. Later examples include William Fullwood of London (1498 - 1562) who was apparently a famed author in his day, whilst Christopher Fulwood, a native of Derbyshire, raised forces for King Charles 1st in the Civil War of 1640 - 1648. He was mortally wounded in a fight near the city of Derby in the year 1643. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Hugo de Folewode, which was dated 1379, the Poll Tax Rolls for the county of Yorkshire, during the reign of King Richard 11, known as 'Richard of Bordeaux', 1377 - 1399. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Garrett Family Crest
Garrett Family Crest
This ancient surname is of German and French pre 7th century origins. It derives from either of the popular personal names Gerard or Gerald. "Gerard" comprises the elements "gari" meaning a spear, and "hard" - brave, whilst "Gerald" has the same prefix of "gari", but the suffix is from "wald", meaning to rule.This type of compound name with its echoes of tough living and yet compliance with authority, is very typical of the period in history known as "The dark ages" Later after the 11th century there was a revival in Christian belief, and "names" often became biblical, through association with the crusades. The popularity of Gerard and Gerald was such as to ensure their survival into, and beyond the introduction of surnnames in the 12th century. Nobody is quite sure how many surnames emanate from Gerald and Gerard, but it is known to exceed two hundred, and for examples to be found in almost every European country. These spellings range from Garratt, Gerhard, Garred, and Jarrelt, to Gheraldi, Giraudot, Gilardengo and Gerrelts. Early examples include in England, Henry Jerard in the county of Essex in 1284, and in Germany, Burkhart Gerhart, given as being a burgher of the town of Heilbronn, in the year 1293. The first recorded spelling of the family name anywhere in the world is believed to be that of John Gerard, which was dated 1230, in the Pipe Rolls of the county of Somerset, England. This was during the reign of King Henry 111rd, 1216 - 1272. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Gerrard Family Crest
Gerrard Family Crest
This distinguished name is of Old Germanic origin, from a personal name introduced into Britain by the Normans after the Conquest of 1066 in the Old French forms "Gerard, Gerart" and "Girart". These were adapted from the Old Germanic "Gerhard, Girhard", composed of the elements "geri, gari", spear, and "hard", hardy, brave, strong. The personal name was recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 in the Latinized forms "Gerardus" and "Girardus", and one Jerard "filius (son of) archidiaconi" is mentioned in the Lincolnshire Documents relating to the Danelaw of 1149 - 1162. The personal name proved very popular, as can be deduced from the great number and variety of variant forms that were generated from it, almost all of which are surviving as surnames. These range from Garrett, Garratt, Garred, Garrad, Jarratt and Jarad, to Garrard, Gerrard, Jarrard and Jerrard. One Edward Garrard was an early emigrant to the New World Colonies, leaving London on the "Ann and Elizabeth" in April 1635, bound for St. Christophers and the Barbadoes. A Coat of Arms granted to a family of the name depicts two silver lions combatant on a blue shield, while the Crest is a wivern, tail nowed proper pierced through the neck with a gold spear, headed silver. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of John Gerard, which was dated circa 1170, in "Documents relating to the Danelaw", Lincolnshire, during the reign of King Henry 11, known as "The Builder of Churches", 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Glendinning Family Crest
Glendinning Family Crest
Recorded in several spellings including Glendenning, Glendining, and Glendinning, this is an ancient Scottish surname. It is locational from a place called Glendinning in the parish of Westerkirk, in the county of Dumfriesshire. The name derives from the Welsh "glyn" meaning "valley", "dun", a fort, plus "gwyn" white or fair, hence, "the valley of the white fort". The surname from this source is first recorded in the latter half of the 13th Century (see below). In the "Miscellany of the Scottish Historical Society" one, William de Glendonwyn is recorded as "procurator of the Scottish Nation in the University of Orleans (1408)". In the "Criminal Trials of Scotland" from A.D. 1487 to 1624 reference is made to the stealing of goods from a Bartholomew Glendunwyne (1504) and in the reign of Charles 1 (1625 - 1649) a John Glendinning had his lands forfeited when Montrose, the Kings's lieutenant, whom he supported was defeated. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Adam de (of) Glendonwyn which was dated C.1386, in the "Records of the Baronies of Clifton and Merbrtel". during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
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Goldring Family Crest
Goldring Family Crest
This interesting medieval name has at least two possible origins. The first is a nickname of both English and German origins for a person of wealth, one who wore gold jewellery and ornaments. The surname from this source is first recorded in the early 13th Century and was specifically a name found in London and the Home counties region. However, the second origin source is Scottish locational and derives from an area known as the fifty shilling lands of Goldring in the parish of Kylesteward. The term "fifty shilling" refers to the value and was, therefore a substantial estate, although way "Goldring" as a place name should appear in Scotland is not clear. Thomas Goldring held lands at Prestwich in 1511 whilst Harry Goldringe married Ann Hussey at All Hallows church, London Wall on September 21st 1578. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Thomas Goldring, which was dated 1230, The Pipe Rolls of property holders in Hertfordshire, during the reign of King Henry 111, "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
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Gospatrick Family Crest
Gospatrick Family Crest
 
 
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Gould Family Crest
Gould Family Crest
This long-established surname, with variant spellings Gould, Goult and Gold, is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and has two possible sources. Firstly, it may be from a personal name or nickname, derived from the Olde English pre 7th Century "Golda" (masculine), or "Golde" (feminine), meaning "gold", originally given to one with bright golden hair, or perhaps in some cases to a "precious" person. Hugo fillius (son of) Golda was recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 for Suffolk, and Ralph filius Golde was listed in the 1193 Pipe Rolls of Bedfordshire. The second distinct possibility is that Go(u)ld/Goult is from a metonymic occupational name for a worker in gold, a refiner, jeweller or gilder, derived from the Olde English "golda, golde" (as above). Job-descriptive surnames originally denoted the actual occupation of the namebearer, and later became hereditary. The surname was first recorded in the mid 12th Century (see below), and may derive from either source. Recordings from London Church Registers include: the christening of Ann Gould on December 11th 1580, at St. Andrew's, Holborn, and the christening of Margaret Goult on May 14th 1663, at St. Giles' Cripplegate. The Coat of Arms most associated with the name is a shield divided per saltire gold and blue with a lion rampant counterchanged, the Crest being a blue demi lion rampant bezantee. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Walter Golde, which was dated 1165, in the "Pipe Rolls of Devonshire", during the reign of King Henry 11, known as "The Builder of Churches", 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Goushill Family Crest
Goushill Family Crest
 
 
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Graham Family Crest
Graham Family Crest
Although now widely associated with Scotland and Ireland, this distinguished surname is of Anglo-Saxon origins. It was a locational name originally from the town of Grantham in Lincolnshire, and as such recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as both Graham and Grandham. The translation is either the homestead (ham) on the gravel from the Olde English pre 7th century grand, meaning gravel, or perhaps the personal name "Granta" and hence Granta's homestead. Locational surnames usually developed when former inhabitants of a place moved to another area, and were best identified by the name of their birthplace. The surname Graham was taken to Scotland at the beginning of the 12th Century by the Norman baron William de Graham (see below), holder of the manor in Lincolnshire, from whom many if not all modern bearers are probably descended. James Graham, first marquis and fifth Earl of Montrose (1612 - 1650), fought on behalf of Charles 1st and became lieutenant- general to Charles 11 in 1648. This most notable surname has no less that forty-five entries in the "Dictionary of National Biography", and over forty coats of arms granted to families of the name. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William de Graham, which was dated 1127, in the Foundation Charter of Holyrood Abbey, Edinburgh, during the reign of King David 1st of Scotland, 1124 - 1153. 
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Green Family Crest
Green Family Crest
Recorded in the spellings of Green and Greene, this is one of the most widespread of English, and sometimes Irish, surnames. It is usually of pre 7th century origins, and derives from the word "grene" meaning green. As such it may be topographical for a person resident by a village green or even a place called Green, or as a status name for a young man who played the part of the mystic and fertile "Green Man" sometimes known as "Jack in the Green", in the May Day fertility celebrations. In this context "green" was symbolic of youthful ardour, spring, and the re-growth of nature. Sometimes the surname can be of Irish origins, and a translation of the ancient Gaelic given name "Uaithne". As this also means "green," it probably has the same basic meaning and origin as the English form. Examples of the early recordings taken from authentic rolls, registers and charters of the Middle Ages, include Richard de la Grene of the county of Norfolk in the year 1200; William Grene in the Hundred Rolls of Yorkshire in 1230; Robert Othegreen, and Henry on the Green, both of Worcestershire, in 1274. Among the many distinguished namebearers listed in the "Dictionary of National Biography" are Charles Green (1785 - 1870), an early aeronaut, who made the first ascent with a hydrogen gas balloon in 1821. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Geoffrey de Grene. This was dated 1188, in the "Pipe Rolls" of the county of Kent", during the reign of King Henry 11 of England. He was known as "The Builder of Churches". 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as the Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Greene Family Crest
Greene Family Crest
Recorded in the spellings of Green and Greene, this is one of the most widespread of English, and sometimes Irish, surnames. It is usually of Olde English and Anglo-Saxon pre 7th century origins, and derives from the word "grene" meaning green. It has a nunber of possible origins. It may be topographical for a person resident by the village green, or it can be a "status nickname" for a young man who played the part of the mystic and fertile "Green Man" or "Jack in the Green", in the medieval and later May Day celebrations. In this context "green" was symbolic of youthful ardour, springtime and the growth of nature. Sometimes the surname can be of Irish origins, and a 16th century anglicised translation and spelling of the ancient Gaelic given name "Uaithne". Examples of the early recordings taken from authentic rolls, registers and charters of the Middle Ages, the birth of surnames as we understand them, include: Richard de la Grene of the county of Norfolk in the year 1200; William Grene in the Hundred Rolls of Yorkshire in 1230; Robert Othegreen, and Henry on the Green, both of Worcestershire, in 1274. Among the many distinguished namebearers listed in the "Dictionary of National Biography" are Charles Green (1785 - 1870), an early aeronaut, who made the first ascent with a hydrogen gas balloon in 1821. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Geoffrey de Grene. This was dated 1188, in the "Pipe Rolls" of the county of Kent", during the reign of King Henry 11 of England. He was known as "The Builder of Churches". 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
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Greville Family Crest
Greville Family Crest
This surname is English but of Norman-French origins. It is locational from the village of Greville in the departement of La Manche, Normandy, France. The derivation is from the pre 7th century personal name Creiz and the Old French word "ville", meaning a settlement. Lower in his his famous book "Patronymica Britannica" states that Greville is a parish at the extremity of the isthmus of La Hague. The surname itself first appears in records in the mid 12th Century (see below), and early recordings include those of John de Greville in the Hundred Rolls of Wiltshire in 1273, whilst his grandson William Greville made a loan to King Richard 11nd in 1397. His descendants include Faulke Greville (1554 - 1628), a favourite of Elizabeth 1st, who was granted the earldom of Warwick. Shirley's "Noble and Gentle Men" says that "The family was founded by William Grevel, the flower of the wool merchants in the whole realm of England". He died at Campden, in Gloucestershire in 1401. Robert Greville (1608 - 1643), was the second Baron Brook and speaker of the House of Lords in 1642. He was a parliamentarian general who was killed at Lichfield in the same year. Another namebearer, Algernon Frederick Greville (1789 - 1864), was private secretary to the Duke of Wellington from 1827 - 1842, having been his aide-de-camp and ensign in the Grenadier Guards at Waterloo. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William de Greiuill. This was dated 1154, in the Pipe Rolls of Northumberland. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 

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