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151
Grey Family Crest
Grey Family Crest
This ancient name has two possible origins, the first of which is from an Anglo-Saxon, Old English nickname for someone with grey hair or a grey beard, derived from the Old English pre 7th Century word "graeg", grey. The bearers of the name in Scotland and Ireland were originally the Gaelic "riabhach", meaning "brindled or grey", translated to "Grey" or "Gray". The second origin of the modern name is from the place called "Graye" in Calvados, Normandy, so called from the Old Gallo-Roman personal name "Gratus" meaning "Welcome" or "Pleasing", with the suffix "acum" meaning settlement or village. A notable bearer of the name was Lady Jane Grey (1537 - 1554), who reigned as queen of England from July 9th to the 19th, 1553, before being imprisoned and executed the following year. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Anschitill Grai, which was dated 1086, in the "Domesday Book", Oxfordshire, during the reign of King William 1, known as "The Conqueror", 1066 - 1087. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
152
Gunne Family Crest
Gunne Family Crest
This interesting name has three possible derivations. The first from the Olde Norse Viking pre 7th Century personal name "Gunnr", meaning battle. Secondly, a metonymic occupational name for someone who operated a Seige Cannon, from the Medieval word "gunne" meaning a cannon. This could also have been used as a nickname for a person with a forceful temperament. The name is widespread in Scotland, especially in Caithness, where it is of Norse origin, Gunn was a Caithness, chief of the 12th Century. His name Gunnis an old West Scandinavian personal name. The Gaelic form is "Mac Gille Dhuinn" and means "son of the servant of the brown one". Two early marriages in London are between Richard Gunn and Joane Benson on 22nd October 1627 at St. Margaret's, Westminster, and Alexander Gunnt and Margery Hooper on 26th January 1665 at St. Mary Magdale, Old Fish Street. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William Gun, which was dated 1218, in the "Assize Rolls Lancashire", during the reign of King John, known as "Lackland", 1199 - 1216. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
153
Hague Family Crest
Hague Family Crest
This unusual and interesting name has a number of possible origins. Firstly, it may derive from an Anglo-Saxon topographical name for someone who lived by or in a hedged or fenced enclosure, from the Olde English pre 7th Century term "haga". The name may also be locational in origin, from a place named with the Olde English "haga", or its Old Norse cognate form "Hagi", such as the three places called Haigh, two in West Yorkshire and the other near Manchester. These places are first recorded as "Hagh" (1198), "Hagh" (1379), and "Hage" (1194), respectively. In some few cases the modern surname Hague may be locational from "The Hague" in the Netherlands, in Dutch "Den Haag", which is named from the Old Dutch "haag", enclosure, cognate with the Olde English and Old Norse terms. One William de Haghe was listed in the Subsidy Rolls of Yorkshire in 1327, and the marriage of John Hague and Alice Marshall was recorded in Bradfield, Yorkshire, on February 7th 1589. A Coat of Arms granted to a Hague family of Micklegate, York, Yorkshire is per chevron gold and silver, two mullets blue, in chief and a red crescent, in base. The Crest is a griffin's head erased silver. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Jollan de Hagh, which was dated 1229, in the "Close Rolls of Yorkshire", during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Father of the Navy", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling 
 
154
Hall Family Crest
Hall Family Crest
This ancient surname generally considered to be Anglo-Scottish, has several possible sources. These are that it may be a topographical name for someone who lived at or near a large house called a Hall, or that it could be an occupational name for a person who was employed at such a place. In this case the derivation can be either from the Olde English pre 7th Century word "heall", or the Old German and later Anglo-Saxon "halla", or even the Old Norse-Viking "holl". All have the same meaning of a large house or building. However it can also be a locational surname from any of the places called Hall. These include the villages of Hall in the counties of Lancashire, Carmarthenshire, and Roxburghshire. Early examples of the surname recording taken from surviving rolls and charters include: Nichol del Hall, given as being a "merchant of the duke of Albany" in the year 1400, and William de Hall, who held lands in Irvine, Scotland, in 1426. John Hall, who was born in Kent in 1584, emigrated to New England in 1632, and founded a notable American family. His descendants included Lyman Hall, a signatory of the Declaration of Independence in 1776, Asaph Hall an early astronomer, and Stanley Hall, a pioneer in psychophysics. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Warin de Halla. This was dated 1178, in the "Pipe Rolls" of the county of Essex, during the reign of King Henry 11nd of England, 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
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155
Harcourt Family Crest
Harcourt Family Crest
This name is of locational origin either from the town and ancient chateau of Harcourt near Brionne in Normandy so called from the Olde French 'cour(t)' meaning a court, plus an obscure first element, or from Harcourt near Cleobury Mortimer in Shropshire. Recorded as Havretescote in the Domesday Book of 1086 and as Havekercot in 'The Hundred Rolls of Shropshire' dated 1274, the name derives from the Old English pre 7th Century 'haforcere', a hawker or falconer, plus 'cot(e)', a cottage hence 'the falconer's cottage'. Another place called Harcourt near Wem in Shropshire; recorded as Harpecote in the Domesday Book, derives its first element from the Old 'hearpere', a harper. One, Philip de Harecourt was recorded in the Knights Templars Records, of Sussex, dated 1139, and Sir Robert de Harcourt (deceased 1202) acquired the manor of Stanton in Oxfordshire. Simon Harcourt, first Earl Harcourt (1714 - 1777) was governor to the Prince of Wales, 1751 - 1752. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Turchetil, Sire de Harcourt, which was dated 1024, 'Records of Norman Land Owners', during the reign of Canute the Dane, 1016 - 1035. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.
 
 
156
Harding Family Crest
Harding Family Crest
This is an English name of considerable antiquity, and usually recorded as Harding or Arding. It has its origins in the pre 7th Century personal name 'H(e)arding', the patronymic form of 'H(e)ard', and meaning 'the son of the hard one'! To be so called was well thought of in those far off days, when most 'names' were associated with war, glory and god. The origins are Anglo-Saxon (Germanic), and later after the 1066 Invasion, Norman-French as well. Whilst usually an independent byname, it may also be found as a short form of various pre 10th century compound names with 'hard' as a first element, such as 'Hardwulf', although this does not seem to have come down as a modern day surname, or 'Hardstaff' which has, although this latter maybe a medieval nickname of less salubrious meaning. St. Stephen who died in 1134, was called 'Harding', although purely as a 'given' name. He became Abbot of Citeaux in France in 1110, and founded a severe religious order there, which became known as the Cistercians. Amongst the first colonists of the State of Virginia, New England, was Christopher Harding, who is has the doubtful honour of being recorded as 'kild' at a place called 'At west and Sherlow hundred' sometime before February 16th 1623. A Coat of Arms was granted to William Harding, a citizen of London, by Queen Elizabeth 1st in 1568. This has the blazon of a red field, charged with three gold greyhounds. The crest is a demi leopard rampant on a golden chain. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Roger Harding, which was dated 1199, in the "Pipe Rolls of Northamptonshire", during the reign of King Richard 1, known as "The Lionheart", 1189 - 1199. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling 
 
157
Hardy Family Crest
Hardy Family Crest
This interesting surname is of early medieval English and French origin, and is derived from the nickname for a brave or perhaps fool-hardy person, one who would risk all for ultimate success. It derives from the Old French, Middle English (1200 - 1500) "hardi", meaning bold or courageous. This surname is an example of that sizeable group of early European surnames that were gradually created from the habitual use of nicknames. The nicknames were given in the first instance with reference to a variety of characteristics, such as physical attributes or peculiarities, mental and moral characteristics, supposed resemblance to an animal or bird's appearance or disposition, habits of dress and occupation. The modern surname can be found as Hardy, Hardey, and Hardie in England and Scotland, whilst it is usually Hardi in France. Examples of the surname recordings include William Le Hardy of Lincoln in 1206, and somewhat later, the marriage of John Hardy and Agnes Payce on November 11th 1563. At the church of St Mary Somerset, William Hardie married Margaret Bover on July 17th 1569. An interesting namebearer, recorded in the "Dictionary of National Biography", was Sir Thomas Masterman Hardy (1769 - 1839), who was the flag captain of Nelson in the "Vanguard" and "Foudroyant" (1799), in the "San Josef" and the "St. George" (1801), and in the "Amphion" and the "Victory" (1802 - 1805), on which Nelson died. He was made a baronet in 1806 and became a vice-admiral in 1807. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William Hardi, which was dated 1194, in the "Pipe Rolls of Yorkshire", during the reign of King Richard 1, known as "The Lionheart", 1189 - 1199. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
158
Harman Family Crest
Harman Family Crest
Probably a quarter of English names have strong Saxon or later Germanic influences; Harm and its variant forms Harms, Harmes and Harman comes into these categories. It may be a derivative of the original pre 7th Century personal name "Heremar", a compound which translates as "Army-Famous" and shown in the first recording "Heremerus de La Bolde", 1176, The Pipe Rolls of Stafford, or the name can be locational and derive from the town of Harms in Germany and may then be associated with the Huguenot or "Flemish Weaver" immigrants of the late Middle Ages. The marriage of Henry Harm and Barbara Child was recorded at All Hallows, London Wall, on September 15th 1650, and Ann Harm was christened on July 4th 1675 at St. Dunstan's, Stepney. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Francisca Harme (marriage to Allen Turner), which was dated October 24th 1591, at St. Martin in the Fields, London, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth 1, known as "Good Queen Bess", 1558 - 1603. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
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159
Harrington Family Crest
Harrington Family Crest
This long-established name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational surname deriving from any one of the places called Harrington: in Cumberland, near Whitehaven; in Lincolnshire, near Spilsby; and in Northamptonshire, near Kettering. The place in Cumberland, recorded circa 1160 as "Halfringtuna, Haverinton", is so called from the Olde English pre 7th Century byname "Haefer", from "haefer", he-goat, with the suffix -ing(as)", denoting people, tribe of, and "tun", settlement, enclosure. Harrington in Lincolnshire is recorded as "Harinton" in 1202, and is named with the Olde English "haer", stony ground, with "tun", as before, while the Northamptonshire Harrington, recorded as "Arintone" in the Domesday Book of 1086, and as "Hetherington" circa 1100, is so called from a derivative of the Olde English "haeth", heath; hence, "the settlement of the dwellers on a heath". Harrington may also be an Irish name; it is widespread in Counties Cork and Kerry, where it may be either an Anglicized form of the Gaelic "O' hArrachtain", descendant of "Arrachtan", a personal name from "arrachtach", mighty, powerful, or an English import from the Plantations of the 17th Century. One Elias Harrington was an early emigrant to the American Colonies, leaving London in July 1635 on the "Assurance", bound for Virginia. A Coat of Arms granted to a family of the name depicts a red chevron between three black leopards' faces on a silver shield. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William de Harinton', which was dated 1202, witness in the "Assize Court Rolls of Lincolnshire", during the reign of King John, known as "Lackland", 1199 - 1216. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Hartt Family Crest
Hartt Family Crest
 
 
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Hawker Family Crest
Hawker Family Crest
This interesting name is an occupational surname for someone who bred and trained hawks. It derives from the Middle English 'haueker', a development of the Old English 'hafocere' meaning 'hawker' or 'falconer'. Hawking was an important medieval sport and the training of hawks for the feudal lord was a popular practice in lieu of rent. The Magna Charta, 1215, conceded the right of any free man to keep hawks for his own use. The name was first recorded in the early 13th Century (see below). One Robert le Hauker appears in the Subsidy Rolls of Suffolk, 1283. Edward Hawker was christened on November 26th 1626 in St. Andrew's, Holborn, London. On May 15th 1654, Walter Hawker married Elizabeth Marcie in St. Botolph's, Bishopsgate, London. The name is now mainly found in the South West Midlands of England. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert le Hauekere, which was dated 1214, Curia Rolls of the King for Gloucestershire, during the reign of King John, known as 'Lackland', 1199-1216. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
162
Hayden Family Crest
Hayden Family Crest
This interesting surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational name from one of the various places in England called Heydon and Haydon. Haydon in Dorset, recorded as "Heidon" in the 1201 Feet of Fines, in Somerset, recorded as "Haegdun" in the Early Saxon Chronicles (1046), and in Wiltshire recorded as "Haydon" in the 1242 Book of Fees, all derive from the Olde English pre 7th Century "Heg", hay (or perhaps "hege", hedge, or "(ge)haeg", enclosure) with "dun", down, hill, mountain; hence "hay down". eydon in Norfolk, recorded as "Heidon" in the 1196 Feet of Fines, derives from the same elements, but because of it's topographical position must be taken to mean "hay hill". Haydon in Cambridgeshire, recorded as "Haidena" in the Domesday of 1086, and Haydon Bridge in Northumberland, recorded as "Hayden" in the 1236 Book of Fees, have the Olde English "denu", valley, as their second element; hence "hay valley". In some instances the surname may be of Irish origin, and an Anglicized form of the Gaelic "O Eideain", descendant of Eidean, a personal name from a diminutive of "eideadh", clothes, armour. The surname can be found as Haydon, Heyden, Heydon and Heiden. Walter Haydon is listed in the Subsidy Rolls of Somerset (1327). Recordings of the surname from London Church Registers include; the marriage of Jane Hayden and Nycholas Asheton on October 28th 1552, at St. Michael's, Cornhill, and the christening of Thomas Hayden on July 6th 1570, at St. Andrew's, Halborn. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Thomas de Haiden which was dated 1200, in the "Place Names of Essex", during the reign of King John, known as "Lackland", 1199 - 1216. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
163
Haydock Family Crest
Haydock Family Crest
This is an example of an English locational surname and comes from the town of Haydock in Lancashire. The placename is first recorded in 1169 (in the Lancashire Pipe Rolls) as 'Hedoc' and derives from a Welsh name 'Heiddiog' meaning 'barley place' or 'corn farm' from the Welsh 'haidd', barley. In the modern idiom the surname is also found as 'Haddock', which is the local pronunciation of the placename. Locational names were used especially for those people who left their original homes and went to live or work in another town or village. One William Haydock (d. 1537) a Cistercian monk, was executed for participating in the Pilgrimage of Grace. His body was found at Lottam Hall in the early 1800's. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Hugo de Haidoc (witness). which was dated 1212 The Fees Court Records of Lancashire. during the reign of John 'Lackland' 1199-1216. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
164
Heath Family Crest
Heath Family Crest
This famous surname is of Anglo-Saxon and Olde English pre 7th century origins. It is residential, denoting someone who lived at, on, or by, a moor or heath, or it can equally well be a locational surname from any of the numerous places called Heath, in for example, the counties of Derbyshire, Bedfordshire, Herefordshire, Shropshire and Yorkshire. In all case the derivation is from the Olde English word "haeth", and the later Middle English "hethe", meaning heath or heather, the characteristic plant of heathland areas. The name development has included: Laurence atte Hethe of Sussex in 1296; Peter del Heth of Yorkshire in 1296; and Alan Othehethe of Staffordshire in 1332. One Isack Heath, his wife Elizabeth, and daughter, also named Elizabeth, were early emigrants to the New England colonies of America. They left the port of London on the ship "Hopewell" in September 1635. Notable namebearers include: Nicholas Heath (1501 - 1578). He was appointed Archbishop of York in 1555, and Lord Chancellor of England in the following year; whilst Robert Heath (1575 - 1649) was the Solicitor-general in 1621 and knighted in the same year. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of John de la Heth. This was dated 1248, when he was a witness in the Court Records of the county of Essex, during the reign of King Henry 111rd of England, 1216 - 1272 
 
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Heaton Family Crest
Heaton Family Crest
This is a surname of English origins. It is is locational from any of the places called Heaton in the counties of Northumberland, Yorkshire and Lancashire. The derivation is from the Olde English pre 7th century word 'heah', meaning high and 'tun', a settlement or farm, to give the translation of the dweller at the High Farm. During medieval times it was becoming increasingly popular for people to migrate from their birth place to other areas in search of work, and these people would often be given the name of their original homestead as an easy means of identification. This also resulted in a wide dispersal of the name. Early examples of the surname recording taken from surviving rolls and charters of the medieval period include: Alice Heaton, the daughter of Thomas Heaton, who was christened at Kirkham in Lancashire, on October 21st 1542, whilst Jonathon Heaton was registered as being a landowner in the island of Barbados, in 1680. He is believed to have been the first of the name in the New World. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Sir John de Heton. This was dated 1350, at the village known as Heaton under Horwick, in Lonsdale, Lancashire, during the reign of King Edward III of England, 1327 - 1377. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Henderson Family Crest
Henderson Family Crest


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This is an ancient Scottish name, the patronymic (meaning "son of") form of Hendry, a mainly Scottish variant of the personal name "Henry". Some bearers of the name Henderson are descended from Henrysons, the "d" being a common intrusive element in many languages between "n" and "r". Henry is from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements "haim" or "heim", home, and "ric", power. It was introduced into England by the Normans after the Conquest of 1066 as "Henri". In Scotland the Hendersons of Fordell in Fifeshire are the chief Lowland family of the name, and are believed to be descended from an old Dumfriesshire family of Henrysons. A branch of the Clan Gunn bears the name Henderson, and there is another Clan Henderson of Glencoe. An interesting namebearer, recorded in the "Dictionary of National Biography", was John Henderson (1747 - 1785), who was a notable actor of his day, considered second only to David Garrick. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William Henrisone, which was dated 1374, in Scottish Papers, in the Public Records Office, during the reign of King Robert 11 of Scotland, 1371 - 1390. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Henson Family Crest
Henson Family Crest
 
 
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Herle Family Crest
Herle Family Crest
 
 
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Heron Family Crest
Heron Family Crest
English and French (Héron): nickname for a tall, thin person resembling a heron, Middle English heiroun, heyron (Old French hairon, of Germanic origin). English: habitational name from Harome in North Yorkshire, named with Old English harum, dative plural of hær ‘rock’, ‘stone’. This surname has evidently become confused with 1. Irish: reduced form of O’Heron, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hUidhrín ‘descendant of Uidhrín’, a personal name from a diminutive of odhar ‘dun’, ‘swarthy’. Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hEaráin (see Haren). Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Chiaráin ‘son of the servant of (Saint) Ciarán’ (see Kieran).  
 
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Heron Family Crest
Heron Family Crest
 
 
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Hesketh Family Crest
Hesketh Family Crest
 
 
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Heward Family Crest
Heward Family Crest
 
 
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Hill Family Crest
Hill Family Crest
This distinguished surname, with over fifty entries in the "Dictionary of National Biography", and having no less than seventy-five Coats of Arms, is of Olde English pre 7th century derivation. It has two completely distinct possible origins. The first and most obvious being a topographical name from residence by or on a hill. The derivation is from the word "hyll", and requires no further explanation. These topographical surnames, which in their early forms were accompanied by a preposition such as ''ate'' or ''del'', were mong the earliest created, as natural and man-made features in the landscape provided easily recognisable distinguishing names in the small communities of the Middle Ages. Early examples of the name from this source include William Attehil of Cambridge in the 1260 Subsidy Rolls and Thomas del Hill of Yorkshire in the 1379 Poll Tax rolls. However recent research indicates that many name holders may derive from the medieval personal and baptismal name "Hille". This is a semi nickname or short form of one of the many Anglo-Saxon compound names with the first element "hild", meaning battle or war, such as Hildebrand and Hilliard or the French ''hilaire'' from the Latin ''hilaris'' meaning ''cheerful''. These are all surnames and personal names in their own right. One of the ''first'' of all Americans was Elizabeth Hill, recorded as born in ''Elizabeth Cittie, Virginia'' before 1620. The earliest coat of arms is that of Sir Robert Hill in the time of King Henry V1 in 1430 was silver, a black chevron between three water bouchets. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Gilbert del Hil, which was dated 1191, in the "Pipe Rolls of Norfolk", during the reign of King Richard 1, known as "The Lionheart", 1189 - 1199. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
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Hobin Family Crest
Hobin Family Crest
 
 
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Holcombe Family Crest
Holcombe Family Crest
 
 
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Holland Family Crest
Holland Family Crest
 
 
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Holt Family Crest
Holt Family Crest
Recorded in over forty spelling forms including Holt, Hoult (England), Holte, Holtzer, Holzer, Holzmann, Holtmann, Holting (Germany), Holdt and Holten (Danish and Norwegian, Hult (Swedish) and various compounds such as Holeberg (German) and Hultberg (Swedish) both meaning Wood Hill, the origin is probably either pre 7th century English or German or perhaps both. It can be either topographical or locational. As the former, the name was given to someone who lived in or by a wood or copse, derived from the word "holt", meaning wood. Topographical surnames were among the earliest created, since both natural and man-made features in the landscape provided easily recognisable distinguishing names in the small communities of the Middle Ages. As a locational surname Holt may come from any of the numerous places named ''Holt, found throughout the English countryside and in Northern Europe. The surname was an early introduction into America, with Randall Holt being recorded as being a resident at James City, Virginia, in 1623. He arrived on the ship "George" in 1620, the same year as the famous Pilgrim Fathers. The first known recording of the family name anywhere in the world is shown to be that of Hugo de Holte. This was dated 1185, in the records of the Knight Templars of England, Kent, during the reign of King Henry 11nd, 1154 - 1189. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Hooley Family Crest
Hooley Family Crest
 
 
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Hooton Family Crest
Hooton Family Crest
 
 
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Hopton Family Crest
Hopton Family Crest
 
 
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Horne Family Crest
Horne Family Crest
 
 
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Hough Family Crest
Hough Family Crest
 
 
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Hudson Family Crest
Hudson Family Crest
This interesting Anglo-Scottish surname is a patronymic. It derives from the personal name "Hudde", which itself has three possible origins. Firstly it may be a nickname form of the pre 7th century Old Saxon "Hugh", a name meaning "mind or heart". This name was very popular with the Normans, who used it widely in England after the Conquest of 1066. Secondly Hudde can be a nickname form of the Germanic and French "Ricard or Richard", and thirdly it can be from the Olde English personal name, "Huda", which gave its name to places such as Huddington in Worcestershire. In England Hudson is especially popular in Yorkshire. This county is also the home of the variant form Hutson - a dialectal transposition, of which the first recording may be that of August 16th 1618, when Mogerit Hutson was christened at Nunkeeling, Yorkshire. In Scotland the earliest record of Hudson is probably that of James Hudson, a charter witness recorded in the register of Kelso Abbey in 1466. Variants of the Scottish name include "Hudsone" in 1567, whilst "Hutson" is recorded there in 1637. Diminutives of Hudson include Huddy and Huddle, found in Devonshire and Cornwall. Amongst the many famous nameholders was Henry Hudson, 1580 - 1611, who is credited with discovering the 'North West Passage' and Hudson's Bay in Canada. Michael Hudson, who died fighting in the Second Civil war 1646 - 1648, was chaplain to King Charles 1st, and Scout Master to the Northern Army. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William Hudde, which was dated 1273, in the "Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire", during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. 
 
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Hughes Family Crest
Hughes Family Crest
Recorded in over seventy spellings and found throughout Europe in forms including Hue, Hugh, Hugo, Hew, the Swisse Huge, the Bavarian Hugg and the French aphetic Gon, to the diminutives including Hugett, Huelin, Hugonneau, Gonnet, Gonout, Gonoude, and the Italian Ughini, this is a name of pre 7th century German origins. The name means "heart", and it is perhaps not surprising that given such a meaning the personal name was and remains highly popular. Both as a surname and a first name it was to be found in almost every European country by the 12th century. The surname may be the first of all hereditary recordings to be found in England. This was the country which first adopted both surnames and register recordings as we know them today. These early recordings include such examples as Richard Hue of the city of Worcester, in the year 1275, and John Hugh of the county of Sussex in 1296. In Germany in the year 1402, one Willi Hugo is recorded as being a burger of Ravensburg, whilst in London Racque Hugo, a French Huguenot, was a witness at Threadneedle Street French Church, on March 6th 1639. The first known recording of the family name is shown to be that of Rogerus Hugo. This was dated 1185, in the rolls of the Knight Templars of England during the reign of King Henry 11nd, 1154 - 1189. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop", often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Hulme Family Crest
Hulme Family Crest

This interesting surname of English and Scottish origin with variant spellings Holme, Home, Hume Hulme, and Holmes, is a topographical name for someone who lived by a holly tree, deriving from the Olde English pre 7th Century "hole(g)n", Middle English "holin, holm" meaning "holly", "holm-oak". It may also be a topographical name for someone who lived on an island, in particular a piece of slightly raised land lying in a fen or partly surrounded by streams, deriving from the Old Norse "holmr" meaning "small island", or it may be a locational name from places called Holme in Bedfordshire, Derbyshire, Huntingdonshire, Lancashire, Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Nottinghamshire, Westmorland, and the East and North Riding of Yorkshire, deriving from the same element. The surname dates back to the late 12th Century (see below). London Church records include one George Hulme, who married Dorrytyr Coocke on February 16th 1602, at St. Michael Bassishaw, and Joane, daughter of Thomas Hulme, who was christened on August 9th 1612, at St. Andrew's, Holborn. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Roger de Holm, which was dated 1186, in "Sir Christopher Hatton's Book of Seals", Leicestershire, during the reign of King Henry 11, known as "The Builder of Churches", 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Hunt Family Crest
Hunt Family Crest
This ancient surname is of pre 7th century English origins. It is usually an occupational surname for one who hunted wildlife for a living. In the Middle Ages the term "hunter" was an official title, and there were different categories from game hunters on foot to the mounted huntsmen, who pursued stags and wild boar. The penalty for hunting without permission in the royal parks, could be death. The word "Hunta" was sometimes used as a personal name. It appears in the placenames "Huntingdon" and "Huntingfield". These translate as "Hunta's Hill" and "the land of the Hunta people". Amongst the interesting surname recordings over the centuries, is that of Leonard Hunt, who was one of the earliest emigrants to the new Virginia colony. He embarked from London, England, on the ship "Mathew" on May 15th 1635. Examples of notable namebearers listed in the "Dictionary of National Biography for Great Britain" include Roger Hunt, the Speaker of the House of Commons in 1433, Sir John Hunt, knighted by King James 1st in 1611, and James Henry Leigh Hunt, who first published the works of Keats and Shelley in 1816. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Humphrey le Hunte. This was dated 1203, in the charter rolls of the county of Sussex, during the reign of King John of England, known as "Lackland", 1199 - 1216. 
 
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Hunter Family Crest
Hunter Family Crest
Recorded as Huntar, Hunter, and the female Huntress and Huntriss, this ancient surname is of Anglo-Scottish origins. The derivation is from the Olde English pre 7th Century word "hunta", from "huntian", meaning to hunt, with the agent suffix "-er", meaning one who does or works with. The term was used not only of hunters on horseback of game such as stags and wild boars, a pursuit in Middle Ages restricted to the ranks of the nobility, but also as a nickname for both bird catchers and poachers. The surname is first recorded in Scotland in the early 12th century (see below), whilst the first English recording may be that of Simon Huntere in the Curia Regis Rolls for the county of Bedfordshire in the year 1220, whilst half a century later we have the recording of Agnes Huntris also recorded in the Latin form of Venatrix, in the Hundred Rolls of (appropriately) the former county of Huntingdon in 1273 . A Scottish family called Hunter gave their name to the port of Hunterston in the former county of Ayrshire, now part of Strathclyde region, an estate being granted to Norman Huntar in 1271. Later examples of surname recordings taken from surviving church registers in the diocese of Greater London include the christening of Awdrey, the daughter of John Hunter, on October 1st 1540, at St. Leonard's Eastcheap; and the marriage of Allen Hunter and Helen Bolton on June 26th 1558 at St. Lawrence Jewry, Milk Street. One of the earliest settlers in the New World was Francis Hunter, aged nineteen, who sailed from the port of London aboard the ship "Thomas and John" bound for Virginia, in June 1635. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William Huntar. This was dated 1116, in the registers of Scotland known as the Inquisition of Earl David. This was during the reign of King Alexander 1st of Scotland, 1107 - 1124. 
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Huntington Family Crest
Huntington Family Crest
This long-established and distinguished name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational surname deriving from any one of the places called Huntington in Cheshire, Herefordshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire and Yorkshire, or from the county town of Huntingdon. The places in Cheshire, Staffordshire and Yorkshire, recorded as Hunditone" (Domesday Book, 1086); "Huntendon" (Fees Rolls, 1198); and "Huntindune" (Domesday), respectively, all share the same meaning and derivation, which is "the hill of the huntsmen", from the genitive plural form of the Olde English pre 7th Century "hunta", hunter, with "dun", hill. The places called Huntington in Herefordshire and Shropshire, recorded in Domesday as "Huntenetune, Hantinetune" and "Hantenetune", are named with the Olde English "hunt(en)a", as before, and "tun", enclosure, settlement; hence, "the settlement of the huntsmen". Huntingdon is "Huntedun" in Domesday, and means "the huntsman's hill", or "Hunta's hill", from the Olde English personal name. Early recordings of the surname include: Humphrey de Huntendun (1202, Bedfordshire); William de Huntinton (1280, Worcestershire); and Thomas de Huntyngton (1379, Yorkshire). The marriage of Thomas Huntington and Ellen Bullen was recorded at St. Botolph's, Bishopsgate, London, on August 20th 1564. Samuel Huntington (1731 - 1796), one of the signatories of the American Declaration of Independence, was descended from Simon Huntington, who emigrated to Boston with his family in 1633. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Eustace de Huntendone, which was dated 1086, in the "Register of Old English Bynames", during the reign of King William 1, known as "The Conqueror", 1066 - 1087. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
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Hyde Family Crest
Hyde Family Crest
This most interesting surname is a variant of "Hide", which has two possible origins. Firstly, it may be a topographical surname for the "holder of a hide", which described someone who lived on and farmed a piece of land originally named as a "hide of land" from the Olde English pre 7th Century "hi(gi)d". A hide was quite a substantial amount for those days, varying from sixty to one hundred and twenty acres. It seems to have been originally fixed as the amount of land necessary to support one extended family, as the Olde English word for a household, "higan", would seem to suggest a common etymology with "hi(gi)d". The name may also be a variant of the personal feminine name "Ida", with the inorganic "h" usually added to names beginning with a vowel. Avice atte Hyde was recorded in 1296 in the Subsidy Rolls of Sussex. Interesting namebearers include Edward Hyde (1609 - 1674), first earl of Clarendon, who was a supporter of Charles 1 and became secretary of state, lord chancellor and chief advisor to Charles 11 at the Restoration. Edward Hyde, Esq. popularly known as Lord Cornbury, was appointed Captain General and Governor-in-Chief of New York in 1701. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert de la Hyda, which was dated 1188, in the "Pipe Rolls of Dorset", during the reign of King Henry 11, known as "The Builder of Churches", 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling 
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Ithell Family Crest
Ithell Family Crest
 
 
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Jennings Family Crest
Jennings Family Crest
This interesting surname, is of early medieval English origin, although later strongly associated with both Wales and Ireland. Recorded in the spellings of Jennings, Jennins and Jennens, it is a patronymic. It derives from the given name Janyn or Jenyn, a diminutive of the personal name John, and meaning "Little John". John itself derives from the Hebrew name "Yochanan", meaning "Jehovah has favoured (me with a son)". The patronymic surname which in this case means "the son of Little John", dates back to the late 13th Century (see below), "John" being a 12th century Crusader introduction. Soldiers of the crusades returning from the Holy Land, gave to their children and specifically sons, Hebrew and Greek names as a reminder of the fathers "pilgrimage". These "English" personal names which later became surnames, include such examples as Thomas, Isaac, Abraham, and many others. In this case early recordings include Walter Jannes and Richard Janyns in the Subsidy Rolls of Worcestershire of 1327, and Thomas Jenyn, in the charter rolls of 1428 known as "Inquisitions and Assessments relating to Feudal Aids". Elizabeth, the daughter of Thomas Jennyns, was christened on August 9th 1544, at St. Pancras', Soper Lane, London, and Jeffrey Jennings was christened on August 24th 1561, at St. Dunstans in the East, London. Among the namebearers in the "Dictionary of National Biography" is Sir Patrick Alfred Jennings (1831 - 1896), who was Premier of New South Wales. He was born in Newry, Ireland, and emigrated to the gold fields of Victoria in 1852, before moving to New South Wales in 1863. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Roger Jonyng, which was dated 1296, in the Subsidy Rolls of the county of Sussex, during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Jerome Family Crest
Jerome Family Crest
Recorded in the spellings of Jerrom, Jerrome, Jerram, Gerram, Jerran, Jeram, Jaram, and the patronymics Jerrems and Jeromson, this is an English medieval surname, but of continental and near eastern origins. Almost certainly introduced into England by the returning Crusaders and pilgrims from the Holy Wars in Palestine during the 12th century, it derives from the Ancient Greek name 'Hieronymos', composed of the elements "hieros" meaning "sacred" plus "onyma", a name. It had earlier achieved some popularity in France during the Dark Ages as a personal name, being given in honour of St. Jerome (circa 347 - 420). A secondary origin is that for some nameholders the development may be from the Norman personal name 'Gerram'. This is composed of the elements "geri" meaning a spear, plus "hraban", a raven. As such this personal name was introduced by the Norman invaders in 1066. Early examples of the surname recordings taken from early rolls and charters include: Roger Geram in the catalogue of Ancient Deeds for the county of Leicestershire, in the year 1333, and Katheryn Jeram who married John Watman on August 19th 1555, at St. Margaret's church, Westminster. The first recorded spelling of the family name is believed to be that of William Geran, which was dated 1194, in the "Curia Regis Rolls of Shropshire". This was during the reign of King Richard 1st of England, known as "The Lionheart", who reigned from 1189 to 1199, leaving the country in some considerable debt. Throughout the centuries surnames in every country have continued to "develop," often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Keeler Family Crest
Keeler Family Crest
This unusual and interesting name is of Medieval English origin and is found particularly in the south east of England. It is an occupational surname for a boatman or boatbuilder, derived from the Middle English "Kele", meaning ship, or barge as in the "Keeler", a barge much used in the south and eastern regions for navigating shallow rivers. The Middle English word was influenced by the Old Dutch "Kiel", rather than directly deriving from the Olde English pre 7th Century "ceol". Anne Keeler was christened on the 10th March 1593 at Boughton under Blean, Kent and the marriage of Henry Keeler to Elizabeth Russell was recorded on the 15th January 1681 at St. James's, Dukes Place, London. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Petter Keeler, married Tamjen Harris, which was dated 25th June 1551, Willesborough, Kent, during the reign of King Edward VI, The Boy King, 1547 - 1553. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
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Kennedy Family Crest
Kennedy Family Crest
This is an anglicized form of an Olde Gaelic (Scots and Irish) personal/nickname 'cinneidigh or cinneide', a compound of the elements 'cinn' meaning 'head', plus 'eide' translating variously as 'grim' or 'helmeted'. Cinneide was the nephew of Brian Boru, High King of Ireland (1002 - 1014), and the surname O Cinneide (the Gaelic prefix 'O' indicating 'male descendant of') came into being in Ireland in the 11th Century. The 'Annals of the Four Masters' record an O Cinneide, Lord of Tipperary in 1159. The first recorded Scottish name bearer appears to be Gilbert Mac Kenedi who witnessed a charter in Melrose circa 1165 - 1170. (The prefix 'mac' means 'son of'). The Scottish Kennedys are by remote origin Irish Gaels. In 1296 one, Alexander Kennedy was canon of Glasgow. Duncan Kennedy, provost of Aberdeen, 1321 - 1322 was the first recorded of the name in the north east. The Kennedy's held the lands of Kermuck (Aberdeenshire) for generations. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Henry Kennedy or Mac Kenede, which was dated 1185 - Leader of a rebellion in Galloway, during the reign of King William, The Lion of Scotland, 1165 - 1214. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Kinaston Family Crest
Kinaston Family Crest
 
 
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Kinsman Family Crest
Kinsman Family Crest
Recorded in several forms including Kingman, Kingsman and possibly Kinsman, this interesting surname is medieval English. It derives from the pre 7th century Olde English word "cyning", which does actually mean a king, with "-man", which can have a number of meanings including friend, manager, or servant of. As such it can be described as occupational for a person employed in the king's household, or someone who looked after royal property, such as a steward, reeve, or estate-keeper. It was also used as a nickname for the assistant to the person who played the part of the king in a pageant, or for the servant of any man who had attracted the nickname "King" for conducting himself in a kingly manner, for instance, or who had won the title in some contest. In the spelling as Kinsman, this may be a short form of Kingsman or a development of 'kinnesman' meaning a cousin or realtive by blood as in William Kinesman of Norfolk in 1198. Early examples of recordings include those of William Kingman in "Kirby's Quest for Somerset", for the year 1275, and Godwin Kingesreive in the Lincolnshire tax rolls known as the Feet of Fines in 1208. Henry Kingsman, his wife Joane and their five children were early emigrants to the American colonies. They left Weymouth in March 1635, bound for New England. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Godwin Kingesman, which was dated 1166, in the "Pipe Rolls of Norfolk", during the reign of King Henry 11, known as "The Builder of Churches", 1154 - 1189. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Kinveton Family Crest
Kinveton Family Crest
 
 
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Klein Family Crest
Klein Family Crest

This is one of the most famous of all surnames of Germanic origins. It is a nickname, and is recorded in some fifty spellings ranging from Klein, Kleyn, and Cline, to De Cleyne, Kleinermann, and Klejna, and with many compounds such as Kleinbaum and Kleinhandler. However spelt the origination is pre 7th century a.d., and the derivation is from the words klein or kleyne meaning "small". In ancient times before the introduction of surnames in about the 12th century, nicknames, particulary those of endearment were very popular. In this case the word was probably applied to the youngest member of a family, although it could also have applied to one of small stature or even the reverse! Pre-medieval humour was both robust and personalised, so "Klein" may on occasion have been a nickname for a large person! The surname is one of the first ever recorded anywhere, and early examples taken from the authentic German charters and registers of the period, confirm its popularity. These include Walthem der Kleine of Kassel in the year 1209, Kounrad Claineman of Oberschwaben in 1283, Conrad Klainer of Friedingen in 1424, and Johan Klainhain of Konstanz in 1469. The first known recording of the surname anywhere in the world is probably that of Herolt der Kleine from Wurzburg, Germany, in the charters of that city for the year 1185. Surnames throughout the world have continued to "develop" over the centuries. This often leads to spellings far from their original form. 
 
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Labelle Family Crest
Labelle Family Crest
 
 
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Lacy Family Crest
Lacy Family Crest
This is a noble English and sometimes Irish surname, but one of ultimately Norman-French origins. It originates from the town of Lassy in Calvados, France, and the original name holders came to England with the army of William, Duke of Normandy in 1066. The place name is derived from the Gaulish personal name, "Lascius", itself of biblical and Roman origins. The brothers Ilbert de Lacy and William de Lacy both founded notable and distinguished families in later centuries, with one of Ilbert's descendants being John, the first earl of Lincoln, one of the noblemen who compelled King John to sign the famous Magna Carta in 1215, which helped in time to guarantee freedom for all citizens. William's descendants distinguished themselves in Ireland under King Henry 11 (1154 - 1189), whilst another descendant became Count Peter Lacy (1678 - 1751), and eventually military adviser to Czar Peter the Great, of Russia. There are three spellings of the name in the modern idiom, Lacey, Lacy and Lassey. Examples of the surname recordings over the centuries include Peter Lacye who married Hester Shawe in London in 1571, whilst William Lacey was an early emigrant to the New World colonies. He left the port of London on the ship "Thomas and John" in June 1635, bound for Virginia. No less that twenty four coats of arms have been granted to this illustrious family, among them that of the Lacys of Herefordshire, dated from the reign of Edward 1st (1272-1307). The arms have the blazon of a gold field charged with a red fesse, and in chief three red martlets. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Roger de Laci. This was dated 1086, in the Domesday Book for Yorkshire. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 

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