Family Crest


Matches 351 to 356 of 356     » Thumbnails Only    » Slide Show

    «Prev «1 ... 4 5 6 7 8

 #   Thumb   Description   Linked to 
351
Wood Family Crest
This famous and popular English and Scottish surname is of pre 7th century Olde English origins. Recorded in several forms including Wood, Woode, Woodd, Wod, Wode and the locational Woods and Woodes, it derives from the word "wudu" meaning a forest or wood. It was originally given either as a topographical name for one who was resident by a wood, or who in the case of the plural Woods related to a person who was both resident in the wood and who obtained his livelihood from the wood, probably as a forester. The surname is first recorded in the early half of the 13th Century (see below) and appears in a great variety of records during that century. These early examples include: Roger del Wode of Yorkshire in 1274; John Atewode of Essex, in the same year; William in le Wode of Cambridgeshire in 1279, and Henry Bythewode of Sussex, in 1296. The earliest recorded namebearer in Scotland was William Wod, a witness at Cawdor in 1295. Judy Wode was christened on October 28th 1549, at St. Margaret's church, Westminster, and Margarett, the daughter of John Wood, was christened on October 18th 1550 at St. Nicholas Acons, in the city of London. One of the earliest emigrants to the new colonies of America was John Wood, aged 26 yrs., who embarked from London on January 2nd 1634, settling in Virginia. The first recorded spelling of the family name is believed to be that of Walter de la Wode. This was dated 1242, in the "Fines Court" rolls of the county of Herefordshire, during the reign of King Henry 111of England, 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as Poll Tax
(At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.) 
['More Links'] 
352
Woodberry Family Crest
Woodberry Family Crest
This interesting name of English origin is a dialectual variant of the locational name Woodbury from a place so called in Devon, or Woodborough in Nottinghamshire. The former variant (Woobury) was recorded as 'Wodeberie' in the Domesday Book of 1086, and the latter 'Ve(s)burg'. The derivation of both placenames is from the Olde English pre 7th Century 'Wuduburg', meaning fort built of wood, or fort in a wood. During the Middle Ages people began to migrate from their birthplace to seek work and often adopted their village name as a means of identification, or alternatively they adopted the name of the Lord of the Manor. At Uffulme Devon, one James Woodberry, married Tabitha Wills on 16th April 1646 and on the 31st December 1653 one Austice Woodberry was christened also at Uffulme, Devon. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of David de Wodebir, which was dated 1273, Hundred Rolls Devon, during the reign of King Edward I, The Hammer of the Scots, 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
353
Worden Family Crest
Worden Family Crest
Recorded as Warden and Worden, this long-established surname has two distinct origins, each with its own history and derivation. Firstly, it may have originated as an occupational name for a watchman or guard, deriving from the Norman French word "wardein", one who guards. The surname from this source has the distinction of being first recorded in the Domesday Book (see below). Other early recordings include: Walter Wardein (Oxfordshire, 1273), and John le Wardeyn (Cambridgeshire, 1289). Job-descriptive surnames originally denoted the actual occupation of the namebearer, and later became hereditary. The second possibility is locational from any of the various places called Warden in England. These places include: Warden, a parish and village in Northumberland, recorded as "Waredun", circa 1175; the parish of Warden, east of Queenborough in Kent; Old Warden, in Bedfordshire, appearing as "Wardone" in the Domesday Book of 1086; and also Warden in Northamptonshire. In 1232, one Symon de Waredon was noted in Records of Clerkenwell (Kent). A notable bearer of the name was William Warden (1777 - 1849), a naval surgeon, in attendance on Napoleon during his voyage to, and in St. Helena (1815). A coat of arms granted to the family has the blazon of a black shield with a silver lion rampant. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Wluric Uuerdenus, which was dated 1086, in the Domesday Book of Hertfordshire. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
354
Wortley Family Crest
Wortley Family Crest
This is a very rare dialectal form of the Olde English village names either Wortley or Wordsley. The meaning in both cases is much the same, the fenced area of pasture from the 6th century 'wyrt-leah'. There are several examples of the village names, although the predominant area is Yorkshire and Lancashire. Locational names were give to people when they moved from the original village, but as they moved further away the spelling form became more distorted, sometimes to the point of being totally unrecognisable. In this case Wortley often exchanged the 't' for a 'd' as it moved south, and sometimes it added letters even into the present century, as in the case of Whordley. We can offer any explanation except a combination of local dialect, which was very strong, and poor spelling, which persists today! Examples of the name recordings include George Worthlye who married Agnis Horne at Bampton, Oxon, on December 4th 1582, James Wordley, who married Diana Burr at the church of St Mary le Bone, London on May 24th 1779, and Charles Whardley, christened at St Dunstans in the East, Stepney, on November 25th 1810. The Coat of Arms is from the time of Richard 11, the blazon being silver, on a bend between six martlets in red, three gold bezants. This indicates a soldier of fortune. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Sir Nicholas de Wortley which was dated Circa 1377, recorded in the Jenyns Roll of Chivalry, during the reign of King Richard 11, known as Richard of Bordeaux, 1377 - 1399. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
355
Wynnington Family Crest
Wynnington Family Crest
 
 
356
York Family Crest
York Family Crest
Recorded as York and Yorke, this is an English surname. It is locational from the ancient city and county of York, the former capital of the North, whose origins pre-date the Roman occupation of 55 - 410 a.d. Locational names were given either to the local lord of the manor and his descendants or as easy indentification to people who migrated to other places or even other countries. The word "york" derives from the Ancient Greek word "eburos" meaning "yew tree". The Romans adopted the word and Latinized it to "Eboracum", and this is the first known recording for York in circa 150 a.d. When the Vikings captured the city eight hundred years later in 962 a.d. they adapted the name to their variant of "Yorvik", which later became York. The "modern" spelling of the city first appears as "Yeorc" in 1205, not long before the first surname. Recordings of the name include: Ernisius de Eboracum in the Pipe Rolls of Yorkshire for 1160; this is a return to the original Latin (Roman) form of one thousand years earlier; Agnes de York in the 1379 Poll Tax Rolls, whilst in 1557, Guylberte Yorke and Amye Bonde were married at St. Michael's Church, Cornhill, London. This was in the reign of Mary 1st of England, known as "Bloody Mary", 1554 - 1558. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of John de York, which was dated 1324, in the "Coroner's Rolls of London". Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
['More Links'] 

    «Prev «1 ... 4 5 6 7 8