Family Crest


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Belcher Family Crest
Belcher Family Crest
 
 
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Bell Family Crest
(At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.) 
 
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Belty Family Crest
Belty Family Crest
 
 
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Benning Family Crest
Benning Family Crest
 
 
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Benson Family Crest
Benson Family Crest
 
 
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Berewick Family Crest
Berewick Family Crest
 
 
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Bigod Family Crest
Bigod Family Crest
 
 
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Billet Family Crest
Billet Family Crest
 
 
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Billing Family Crest
Billing Family Crest
 
 
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Birchard Family Crest
Birchard Family Crest
 
 
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Bishop Family Crest
Bishop Family Crest
 
 
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Bissell Family Crest
Bissell Family Crest
 
 
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Black Famly Crest
Black Famly Crest
 
 
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Blackaby Family Crest
Blackaby Family Crest
Recorded as Blackby, Blackaby, Blackeby, Blackerby and possibly others, this is an English residential surname with Viking antecendents. It derives from residence at Black's Farm, as in the pre 7th century Old English 'Blak atta bi' with 'bi' being the Scandanavian word for a farm, and 'Blak' curiously meaning either 'black' or 'white'. If the meaning was black it was probably an ethnic name for a Celt, if 'white' it may have described a Norseman or Dane, since these were traditionally fair haired. It may also originate from a 'lost' medieval village called Blackeberwe' It is believed that some seven thousand British Isles surnames originate from now 'lost' locations. Richard Blackerby (1574 - 1648), the vicar of Great Thurlow in Essex, was a prominent puritan and a close supporter of Oliver Cromwell. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Simon de Blackeberwe. This was dated 1275 in the Pipe Rolls of the county of Devon, during the reign of King Edward 1st of England. He was known to history as 'The Hammer of the Scots', and reigned from 1272 to 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling 
 
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Blackaby Family Crest
Blackaby Family Crest
 
 
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Bluck Family Crest
Bluck Family Crest
 
 
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Boreman Family Crest
Boreman Family Crest
 
 
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Bostock Family Crest
Bostock Family Crest
 
 
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Bourne Family Crest
Bourne Family Crest
 
 
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Bradborne Family Crest
Bradborne Family Crest
 
 
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Bradshaw Family Crest
Bradshaw Family Crest
 
 
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Bramhall Family Crest
Bramhall Family Crest
 
 
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Braylsford Family Crest
Braylsford Family Crest
 
 
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Bretagne Family Crest
Bretagne Family Crest
 
 
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Brett Family Crest
Brett Family Crest
 
 
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Brisley Family Crest
Brisley Family Crest
 
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Brown Family Crest
Brown Family Crest
 
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Browne Family Crest
Browne Family Crest
 
 
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Brugge Family Crest
Brugge Family Crest
 
 
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Bruyn Family Crest
Bruyn Family Crest
 
 
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Brydges Coat of Arms
Brydges Coat of Arms
 
 
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Brydges Family Crest
Brydges Family Crest
 
 
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Buck Family Crest
Buck Family Crest
This interesting surname with variant spelling Bucke, has a number of possible origins. Firstly, it may derive from the Old English pre 7th Century "bucca" a male goat or "bucc" a male deer, and would have originated as a nickname for a man with some fancied resemblance to the animal, e.g. strength, speed or sturdiness. One, Herbert Bucke is recorded in the Pipe Rolls of Sussex (1195), and Robert Buc appears in the Pipe Rolls of Suffolk (1200). The surname may also be metonymic for longer occupational names, e.g. Roger le Bucmanger, recorded in the Assize Court Rolls of Warwickshire (1221), was a dealer in bucks or venison, and Walter Bucswayn, noted in the Subsidy Rolls of Somerset (1327), was a goat herd. Another possibility is that the name is of topographical origin, deriving from the Old English "boc" a beech tree, and would have referred to someone living by a prominent beech tree. Peter atte Buck, registered in the Subsidy Rolls of Suffolk, (1327). In 1549, Margaret Buck married Patrick Colley at St. Mary Woolnoth and on December 10th 1549, Lucas Buck was christened at St. Margaret's, Westminster. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Godwig se Bucca, which was dated circa 1055, Old English Byname Register, Somerset, during the reign of King Edward the Confessor, 1042 - 1066. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
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84
Buck Family Crest
(At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.) 
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Buckley Family Crest
Buckley Family Crest
 
 
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Bulkeley Family Crest
Bulkeley Family Crest
 
 
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Burgess Family Crest
Burgess Family Crest
This interesting surname is of Old French origin, and derives from the Middle English "burge(i)s", a development of the Old French "burgeis" meaning inhabitant and freeman of a fortified town, especially one with municipal rights and duties. Burgesses generally had tenure of land or buildings from a landlord by "burgage". In medieval England burgage involved the payment of a fixed money rent. In Scotland it involved payment in service, guarding the town. The surname dates back to the early 12th Century (see below), and early recordings include Ralph le1 Burgeis (1195), in the Pipe Rolls of Sussex, and Philip Burges (1220), in the Cartulary of Oseney Abbey, Oxford. Variations in the spelling of the surname include Burgis, Burgise and Borges. London Church Registers record the marriages of Davye Burges to Agnes Taylor on January 27th 1582, at St. Thomas the Apostle, and Robert Parrin Burgess to Mary Langford on February 10th 1750, at St. Bartholomew the Great. A Coat of Arms granted to a Burgess family is blue, a fesse between a crescent in chief and a rose in base, all gold. The Crest is a gold fleur-de-lis. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Geoffrey Burgeis, which was dated 1115, in the "Winton Rolls of Hampshire", during the reign of King Henry 1, known as "The Lion of Justice", 1100 - 1135. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling 
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Burgess Family Crest
Burgess Family Crest
 
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Burlingame Family Crest
Burlingame Family Crest
 
 
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Bushnell Family Crest
Bushnell Family Crest
 
 
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Butler Family Crest
Butler Family Crest
 
 
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Calkins Family Crest
Calkins Family Crest
 
 
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Calston Family Crest
Calston Family Crest
 
 
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Calston Family Crest
Calston Family Crest
 
 
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Calverley Family Crest
Calverley Family Crest
 
 
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Cawood Family Crest
Cawood Family Crest
 
 
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Channon Family Crest
Channon Family Crest
 
 
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Chapin Family Crest
Chapin Family Crest
 
 
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Chase Family Crest
Chase Family Crest
 
 
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Chatham Family Crest
Chatham Family Crest
 
 

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