Family Crest


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Abbey Family Crest
Abbey Family Crest
 
 
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Abbott Family Crest
Abbott Family Crest
 
 
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Abell Family Crest
Abell Family Crest
 
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Abernathy Family Crest
Abernathy Family Crest
 
 
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Abrahams Family Crest
Abrahams Family Crest
 
 
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Abrams Family Crest
Abrams Family Crest
This long-established surname is of early medieval English origin, and is a patronymic form of the Hebrew male given name "Avraham", originally "Abram", "high father", later changed to "Abraham", "father of a multitude (of nations)". This name was borne by the first of the Jewish patriarchs, ancestor of all the Israelites (Genesis 11-25), and Abraham was the name of a priest in the Domesday Book of 1086. In 1170, one Abraham de Stradtuna was noted in the Documents relating to the Danelaw, Lincolnshire. This personal name was used to some extent among Christians in the Middle Ages, and has always been a popular Jewish given name. It was greatly revived after the Reformation, and was particularly popular in the Low Countries where it reverted to its original form of Abram, which is still used there, as it is in Wales. The first bearer of the extended form of the surname was John Abraham (Northamptonshire, 1193), and in 1273, one John Abraam was noted in the Hundred Rolls of Bedfordshire. Modern patronymic forms include: Abrahams, Abrams, Abrahamson and Abramson. On November 5th 1646, Sarah, daughter of Andrew and Gillian Abrams, was christened at St. Mary Abbots, Kensington, London. The Coat of Arms most associated with the name is a shield lozengy gold and red, on a black chief the sun in his splendour, gold, the Crest being a cap of maintenance decorated with a plume of ostrich feathers, all proper. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert Abram, which was dated 1252, in the "Chartulary of the Monastery of Ramsey", Huntingdonshire, during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Abramson Family Crest
Abramson Family Crest
 
 
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Ackerman Family Crest
Ackerman Family Crest
 
 
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Ackley Family Crest
Ackley Family Crest
 
 
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Acott Family Crest
Acott Family Crest
 
 
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Alcock Family Crest
Alcock Family Crest
 
 
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Alsace Coat of Arms
Alsace Coat of Arms
 
 
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Ames Family Crest
Ames Family Crest
This interesting and long-established surname is of medieval English origin, and derives from the Old French given name (or nickname) "Amis", the oblique case of "Ami", Friend, ultimately from the Latin "amicus", a derivative of "amare", to love. The name was introduced into England after the Norman Conquest of 1066, and the forms "Amicia" (feminine) and "Amisius" (masculine) are recorded respectively in Documents relating to the Danelaw, Lincolnshire, dated 1189, and in the Curia Regis Rolls of Hertfordshire, dated 1211. One Rogerus filius (son of) Ami was noted in the Chartulary of Ramsey Abbey, Norfolk, circa 1250, and a Robert Amys appears in the 1273 Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire. On January 18th 1573, William, son of Richard Ames, was christened in Dunstable, Bedfordshire. Notable bearers of the name were William Ames (1576 - 1633), the Arminian minister at Rotterdam in 1613, and professor of theology, Franeker (1622), and Joseph Ames (1689 - 1759), bibliographer and antiquary, who became a fellow of the Royal Society in 1743. On May 11th 1637, Joane Ames, of Yarmouth, a widow, aged 50 yrs., with her three children Ruth, William and John, were listed in a register of those "desirous to passe for New England and there to inhabitt and remaine". The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert Amis, which was dated 1221, in "Medieval Records of Suffolk", during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
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Ames Family Crest
(At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.) 
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Amyas Family Crest
Amyas Family Crest
 
 
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Anjou Family Crest
Anjou Family Crest
 
 
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Appleton Family Crest
Appleton Family Crest
 
 
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Arcand Family Crest
Arcand Family Crest
 
 
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Arderne Family Crest
Arderne Family Crest
 
 
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Arellano Family Crest
Arellano Family Crest
 
 
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Argue Family Crest
Argue Family Crest
 
 
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Armitage Family Crest
Armitage Family Crest
 
 
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Armstrong Family Crest
Armstrong Family Crest
 
 
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Ashmore Family Crest
Ashmore Family Crest
 
 
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Assheton Family Crest
Assheton Family Crest
 
 
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Auditheley Family Crest
Auditheley Family Crest
 
 
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Babcock Family Crest
Babcock Family Crest
 
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Bache Family Crest
Bache Family Crest
This rare and interesting surname is a variant of Boik, which is of English and German origin and is a topographical name for someone who lived by a stream, deriving from the Middle High German "back" or the Middle English "bache". The surname dates back to the early 13th Century (see below). Further recordings include one Ralph de la Bache (1252), "The Rydeware Chartulary, Staffordshire", and William atte Bache (1327), "The Subsidy Rolls of Worcestershire". Variations in the idiom of the spelling include Bache, Beek, Baish, Boich, Baike, Boick. James, son of John and Elizabeth Baike, was christened at St. Matthew, Bethal Green, London, on July 24th 1749. One William Boik married Ann Bowers at St. Dunstan, Stepney, London, on September 30th 1786, and their son William was christened at Mary Whitechapel, Stepney, London, on May 17th 1797. The christening was recorded in London of Henry, son of Edward and Elizabeth Deboick, on July 7th 1872 at St. Leonard's, Shoreditch. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Reinee de Backe, which was dated 1212, "The Curia Regis Rolls of Staffordshire", during the reign of King John, known as "Lackland", 1199 - 1216. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 
 
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Bache Family Crest
Bache Family Crest
 
 
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Bache, Richard
Bache, Richard
 
 
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Baggilegh Coat of Arms
Baggilegh Coat of Arms
 
 
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Bailey Family Crest
Bailey Family Crest
 
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Baker Famiy Crest
Baker Famiy Crest
 
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Bakewell Famly Crest
Bakewell Famly Crest
 
 
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Baldington Family Crest
Baldington Family Crest
 
 
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Baldwin Family Crest
Baldwin Family Crest
 
 
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Bamville Family Crest
Bamville Family Crest
 
 
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Bangs Family Crest
Bangs Family Crest
 
 
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Banker Family Crest
Banker Family Crest
 
 
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Barnes Family Crest
Barnes Family Crest
 
 
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Baron Grey de Wilton Coat of Arms
Baron Grey de Wilton Coat of Arms
 
 
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Barrow Family Crest
Barrow Family Crest
 
 
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Bate Family Crest
Bate Family Crest
 
 
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Baudouin Famiy Crest
Baudouin Famiy Crest
 
 
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Bayeux Family Crest
Bayeux Family Crest
 
 
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Baynham Family Crest
Baynham Family Crest
 
 
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Beattie Family Crest
Beattie Family Crest
 
 
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Beggarly Family Crest
Beggarly Family Crest
 
 
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Belcher Family Crest
Belcher Family Crest
 
 
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Bell Family Crest
(At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.) 
 

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