Trivett,  John Henry I

Trivett, John Henry I

Male 1851 - 1931  (79 years)

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  • Name Trivett, John Henry  [1, 2
    Suffix
    Born 22 Apr 1851  Kilmington, Devon, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Gender Male 
    Arrival 1866  [2
    Find A Grave Memorial 14127696 
    Residence 1871  East Gwillimbury, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Occupation 1876  [4
    Labourer in Sawmill 
    Occupation 1880 
    Farmer 
    Occupation 1881  [5
    Engineer 
    Religion 1881  [5
    Christian 
    Residence 1881  Newmarket, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Origin 1881  [5
    English 
    Residence 1901  East Gwillimbury, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Occupation 31 Mar 1901  [6
    Engineer @ $400. 00 per year 
    Residence 1911  Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    Residence Abt 1916  Lake of The Rivers, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Grave Reference Apr 1931  [8
    141 
    Name Harry 
    Religion Protestant 
    Medical Doctor was C. R. Totton 
    Buried Apr 1931  Readlyn, Saskatchewan, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    • Readlyn Cemetery
    Died 2 Apr 1931  Assiniboia, Saskatchewan, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    Cause: Senile 
    • Assinaboia Hospital
    Person ID I181  Sullivan Burgess Family Tree
    Last Modified 6 May 2018 

    Father Trivett, Timothy I,   b. 2 Jun 1826, Shute, Devon, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Jul 1905, Newmarket, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Henson, Thurza,   b. 21 Oct 1830, Burlescombe, Devon, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Feb 1905, Newmarket, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 22 Mar 1852  Kilmington, Devon, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Minister William B. Watson 
    Witness Henry Trivett 
    Witness Mary Chapple 
    Photos
    Trivett, Timothy Childern at the Picnic
    Trivett, Timothy Childern at the Picnic
    Family ID F2360  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Fountain, Mary Ellen,   b. 26 Jul 1853, Thorah, Durham, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 May 1928, Assiniboia, Saskatchewan, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years) 
    Married 12 Jan 1874  Beaverton, Durham, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Minister Reverend E. H. Chown 
    Witness Hannah E. Fountain 
    Witness Joseph Triorth 
    Children 
     1. Trivett, Fredrick,   b. 9 Apr 1874, East Gwillimbury, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 May 1930, Assiniboia, Saskatchewan, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years)  [natural]
     2. Trivett, Franklin,   b. 2 Jun 1875, East Gwillimbury, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Sep 1938, Newmarket, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 63 years)  [natural]
     3. Trivett, John Henry II,   b. 18 May 1878, Beaverton, Durham, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Jul 1968, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years)  [natural]
     4. Trivett, Thurza May Ellen,   b. 2 May 1880, Thorah, Durham, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1938, Newmarket, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 59 years)  [natural]
     5. Trivett, Hazel Agnes,   b. 14 Jan 1897, East Gwillimbury, York, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Jan 1987, Assiniboia, Saskatchewan, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 6 May 2018 
    Family ID F126  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 22 Apr 1851 - Kilmington, Devon, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1871 - East Gwillimbury, York, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 12 Jan 1874 - Beaverton, Durham, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1881 - Newmarket, York, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1901 - East Gwillimbury, York, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1911 - Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Abt 1916 - Lake of The Rivers, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - Apr 1931 - Readlyn, Saskatchewan, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Cause: Senile - 2 Apr 1931 - Assiniboia, Saskatchewan, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Trivett, John Henry Fred Hazel and Mary Ellen Fountain
    Trivett, John Henry Fred Hazel and Mary Ellen Fountain
    Trivett, Timothy Childern at the Picnic
    Trivett, Timothy Childern at the Picnic
    Trivett, John Henry and Fred
    Trivett, John Henry and Fred
    Trivett, John Henry Mary Ellen Fountain House in Sack
    Trivett, John Henry Mary Ellen Fountain House in Sack
    Trivett, John Henry Mary Ellen Fountain with Thurza Trivett Sabin and her son
    Trivett, John Henry Mary Ellen Fountain with Thurza Trivett Sabin and her son

    Documents
    Trivett, John Henry SR Place of Death
    Trivett, John Henry SR Place of Death
    Trivett, John Henry and Mary Ellen Fountain Marriage Record
    Trivett, John Henry and Mary Ellen Fountain Marriage Record

    Headstones
    Trivett, John Henry and Mary Ellen Fountian Grave Stone
    Trivett, John Henry and Mary Ellen Fountian Grave Stone

    Family Crest
    Trivett Family Crest
    Trivett Family Crest

  • Notes 
    • John Henry lived next door to Mary Helen's sister Amanda on the 1871 census. So I assume that is how they met.

      WESTERN NEWMARKETS News of Trivetts, McDonalds and Greensides, who are Remembered in the Friendly Old Town Mr. Mont Lowther, Secretary of the Readlyn Board of Trade, in the Willow Branch district of Saskatchewan, Canada, southwest of Regina, writes to the Era:- The funeral today in our Cemetery of one of your old-time residents. Mr. J. H. Trivett, one-time employee of Cane's Factory, has prompted me to write an account of the Newmarket people of this district. Mr. J. H. Trivett, who passed away peacefully in the Assinaboia Hospital, Wednesday April 1st. at the age of 79, came to this district and filed on 320 Acres of land [raw prairie] which he owned and operated till death took him. His Wife, beloved of everybody, predeceased him some three years while his son Fred, died in the spring of 1930, after having proved up on a quarter section. His daughter, Hazel, [Mrs. Elmer Dennison] and their five children own and operate over twelve hundred Acres of land. The Newmarket Era April 17, 1931, page 4

      The Trivetts Thanks are tendered a correspondent who points out that the late Mr. Henry Trivett, whose recent death in Readlyn, Saskatchewan, Canada evoked the article in last week's Era by Mr. Lowther of Readlyn, had more than the three brothers in Newmarket who were mentioned. Five brothers and a sister survive Henry Trivett: George, Timothy, and Peter previously named and Albert are the four brothers in Newmarket. William Trivett lives in Burk's Falls and the sister Mrs. John Warren resides at 109 Roxborough Street West Toronto. A son of Henry Trivett lives in Aurora. The Newmarket Era 24 4 1931 Page4

      The Newmarket Era 19 9 46 50 Years Ago On Tuesday afternoon, just after the threshing at ex-mayors Cane's barn was finished, the men stated out of the yard with the machinery. A woman driving a horse and buggy came along just then and the horse took fright at the thresher. Mr Harry Trivett went to the lady's assistance and grabbed the horse's head. The animal reared up and threw him from his feet, and as he came down the horse tramped on him with all its weight, sinking the caulk of the shoe into the calf of Harry's leg. The horse was kept under control but Harry had to be driven to the drug store to have the painful wound attended to.

      Written by Hazel Trivett, before her death. History of the Harry Trivett Family in the Lake of the Rivers Municipality 72

      Harry Trivett was born in Horncastle, Devonshire, England April 22, 1851. He came with his parents, Timothy and Thurza Trivett by sailing ship and stagecoach to Newmarket, York, Ontario, Canada. It took six weeks to come in 1857. Here he got his education and papers to operate a stationary steam engine, which I understand are the basic principals that are used, today. His leather bound book is in the Assinaboia Museum for anyone to look at. He worked at Cane's Factory, which made everything from wood from clothespins, pencils to Washtubs. The factory was the main stay of the town for employment.

      He married Mary Ellen Fountain in 1874. She was of Dutch decent from her mother's side and English and French from her Father's side. They had three sons, Frank, Fred and John and two daughters, Thurza and Hazel and it is I who is writing this.

      Dad had an acre and a half outside town limits, it had an orchard and fruit bushes, mother grew all kinds of flowers and a good size pasture for Dad's horses, a beautiful bay, which had to be exercised. He would take me with him and we would go out on Young Street west of town, the same Young Street that runs from Toronto to Sutton West and Jackson's Point on Lake Simcoe. There would be others exercising their horses and we would always have a race and end up the winner. It was fun.

      I also had to pay a dollar a month to go to School in town. Mother took me to the primary School where the Teacher, a Miss Ironsides, could read heads. I learned she was well name and also lived up to it. As I would be walking to School, I would pass pupils going to Second Street School two miles in the country. I brought home my books one day and told Mother I was going with the others. She said I could have the dollar for myself but after a couple of months, she somehow forgot. It was here where I got my schooling and made friends which has stood me in good sted to this day. My last two years there I had a wonderful Teacher, who has been a big influence on my life to this day.

      Frank also worked in Cane's factory, as did Fred. Fred had a bad case of asthma and lost a Lot of time off work. But his Uncle Tim was foreman of the clothespin departments and always kept his job for him at one dollar and twenty-five cents ($1. 25) a day. John went to Toronto to work and live. It was for Fred's health that Dad came west in 1910 to a drier climate. He followed the McDonalds to Moose Jaw. Land was pretty well taken up by then but he filed on the North ¼ of 3 4 and the North West of 35, 7, 28, West 2nd for the beautiful spring on it which flows to this day. Dad returned in the fall and went back again in 1911 to build accommodation for us. As some made sod houses Dad made ours of shiplap. Mother had a sale of household effects and the house and property. We left Newmarket the 11 of August in 1911 on the Grand trunk railroad with a Harvesters Excursion ticket. For ten dollars, we had a coach of red plush seats with a stove in the rear for cooking whatever you had brought to cook. The rest of the train had slot seats and the harvesters got off at stations to eat at lunch counters.

      My Father met us with a team of oxen and a double deck wagon for the settler's effects. We had brought with us, which consisted of a barrel of preserved fruit, a cook stove, table chairs, Mother's great grandFathers clock, whose works were made of wood, beds, quilts and our trunks of clothes, also rhubarb and horse radish root.

      We left Moose Jaw about four P. M. and stopped at a stopping place, twelve miles out, Mother and I slept in the house but Dad and Fred slept in the loft as did other men. At breakfasts, time the flies were so bad on could hardly take a mouthful of food. As we got out on the wide-open prairie with flowers everywhere, it reminded me of a poem I learned at School

      There are the gardens of the desert. These the unshorn fields Bounteous and beautiful For which the speech of England has no name. The Prairies. That described the scene exactly.

      Fred went on the second day with one of the truckers hauling merchandise to stores away from the railroad. Dad, Mother and I stopped at Todd's Stopping Place. This is where the town of Expance now stands. They left me the next day at Lyle McDonalds. I was taken next day to George McDonalds, the half way house between Davyroyd and Deanton Post Offices. I was told I was wanted in the house. It was Fred who said to me "get to these dishes" He had ruled me all my life through Mother. In Newmarket, I could not go skating at the rink on Saturdays that he had spies watching who I skated with and he knew long before I got home. Dad and Mother went on to the Shack Dad had built for us, our future home. Dad was sixty and Mother fifty-seven and starting all over again for the sake of their sons health. We had a tent to cover our possessions until more room was built on. Eventually a porch was build.

      I soon learned how to harness oxen by putting the horse collar on upside down. We got to know our neighbours by them coming to the spring for barrels of water. Deanton post office was in a part sod and part lumber shack. It was a mile and a quarter to the Northeast and up a coulee. We posted our mail on Tuesdays and Fridays and got mail on Wednesdays and Saturdays. It was brought by stagecoach from Moose Jaw with three changes of horses in the sixty miles. We got the News through the Winnipeg Free Press and Prairie Farmer. This is how we learned of the Titanic disaster in April 1912. The mosquitoes were very thick in the long prairie grass. I had to cut strips of paper and roll around my legs under my stocking to protect my legs. I had very thin kid shoes and if I stepped on a cactus, the spikes punctured them and I would have to sit down and pull them out. I soon got so I could drive oxen and would take Mother to William Lowes store to get a good supply of groceries. This store was three and a half miles west of us and was kept supplied by the truckers from Moose Jaw

      Dad built another shack on the east side witch doubled our floor space. When the floor was covered with linoleum, curtains to the windows it looked very comfortable for Fred's rocker, Dad's armchair, Mothers sewing machine and my books. We had to use the coal from the soft coal mines which when broken up you could see the grain of the wood. Mothers never accepted the idea of using buffalo chips. Dad kept on breaking up the virgin prairies to get as many Acres in crop next year. The oxen would be tethered out during the summer, but he built a stable for them for winter.

      Entertainment was nil in our house. Mother belonged to the Salvation Army so a deck of cards was not allowed in the house. When the young people came to visit me, the evening had to be past by conversation.

      Through Dad, I got to go with these young people to my first Dance. The first man who asked me for a Dance I said "No Thanks. I do not care for fruit" A smart alec answer from a kid from Eastern Canada. But a Mr. Stirling made me get up with him and it was not long until I could make my feet move to music. But Dances were few and far between.

      When we came to the homestead in 1911, the C. P. R. was as close as Ogema on the East but in 1912, the train was near as a small town, which they called Readlyn. It sprang up over night with banks, stores and lumberyards. We were only three miles from it. Our post office was changed from Deanton to Readlyn.

      In 1912, Mother and Fred put in a good size garden and people in Readlyn would come out to get vegetables of any kind. Our rhubarb and horseradish roots and Dad's Manitoba, Canada Maples really thrived in the warm ground

      I spent a Lot of time at Mrs. George McDonald's. She had lovely furniture, rugs and silverware, which she brought from Moose Jaw. She liked to have me polish her silverware and keep her furniture dusted. So many people stopped there on their way to either of the post offices she had a Lot of company. She was a beautiful piano player and when her Father in law was there, they had a Lot in common. Tom McDonald was bandmaster of the Newmarket band in Ontario, Canada. He had a wonderful ear for music and could sit back and listen to you play and tell if you were a note out. His family and his grandchildren were all musical

      One very warm Sunday in June Fred and I walked the six miles to St Augustine Church built in the Davyroy District. The first protestant Church south of Moose Jaw. It was supplied by a Missionary Preacher. We had a very heavy electrical storm, but that was the day of the Regina Cyclone. We learned later from the Winnipeg Free press, some people were killed and thousand of dollars’damage done. We stopped for lunch at a homesteader’s cabin. I had to walk back barefooted and carry my shoes and stockings.

      By 1912, The C. P. R. from the East had reached Assinaboia and so had the train from the north and made a terminal in town. The firemen from the East let sparks fall on the long dry grass in the Lake of the Rivers bottom. With a bit of a wind the flames two feet high came very fast toward us. Water had to be brought to us to keep our gunnysacks wet to fight it. We had to save our pasture and what crop we had.

      Alaki holes had to be avoided in the lake bottom. If a mule got in one it would have to be pulled out by a chain around its neck by another team.

      Fred's health greatly improved in the dry air. In 1913, he could walk the three miles into Readlyn, work in the lumberyard and walk home again. It made him feel better to be able to get out and meet people.

      Dad bought himself a team of drivers but he was the only one who could drive them. But, I was glad they had a faster way of getting around.

      Frank had come out and paid us a nice visit for a couple of weeks.

      I had met a tall young man, which I married in February 1914. He had bought a Hudson Bay half and built a four room med house. So, I relieved the crowding at home. It was just four miles from Dad's and every Sunday they came bright and early to spend the day. My Father to spend the day with Elmer outside doing whatever there was to be done. Mother and Fred to get a change of scenery and food.

      It was Elmer who persuaded Fred to file on a quarter section north of Dad's. He could prove up on it by living at home. Elmer put up the necessary fence and offered Fred one thousand dollars for it, as we needed a pasture. Fred bought himself a second hand grey Dort car and had some left over. Life went on for both of us. My sister Thurza came out to visit us.

      Dad and Mother celebrated their 50th Wedding Anniversary in 1924 at my place. I had a fairly large home and Ninety-five attended the celebration. They were given a down comforter, but Mother did not appreciate it too much. She had brought out so many quilts of her own. I guess it was the thought that mattered.

      Mother developed dropsy. She would bloat up to quite a size but after a time in the hospital the Dr. would have it all away and she would be as slim as a young girl. But this could not go on forever. She passed away in the Assinaboia Hospital. May 24th, 1928 at 75 years of age. Never having got her one wish, to get back to Newmarket. John had been here for sometime so he cooked for Fred and Dad. Fred was spending the odd stint in Hospital now and seemed to be wanting there too often. He said he wanted the medicated air. He had just come out and was wanting permission from the council to get back in. But that was hardly enough reason so the council refused it. When John went to call him for dinner on May 18th 1930, he was dead. John stayed on and cooked for Dad, but eventually his lungs filled with fluid and he was put in the hospital where he died April 1st, 1931. Mother and Fred's funeral service was conducted in the United Church in Readlyn, but Dad was an Anglican so we had his service in our home by the lay minister. The three of them died within three years and all were buried in the Readlyn Cemetery. In Dad's will, the Farm was left to John and I Elmer paid John off and he went up north where he died.

      I got the great GrandFathers clock, which kept perfect time until some of the wooden works wore out. The jewellery man said the wood came from Sweden and as the war was on it could not be got.

  • Sources 
    1. [S30] 1891 Canadian Census, taken April 6, 1891.
      Record for Henery Trivitt

    2. [S641] 1916 Canada Census of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta, Year: 1916; Census Place: Saskatchewan, Moose Jaw, 08; Roll: T-21931; Page: 39; Family No: 463.
      Record for Henry Trivett

    3. [S19] 1871 Canadian Census, taken no later then May 1, 1871.

    4. [S1] Ontario: Birth, Death and Marriage Records.

    5. [S23] 1881 Canadian Census, taken April 4, 1881.

    6. [S33] 1901 Canadian Census, taken March 31, 1901.

    7. [S691] 1911 Canadian Census, taken June 1, 1911.

    8. [S367] Readlyn Cemetery, Records, Saskatchewan, Canada.

    9. [S178] GRO England and Wales.