Babcock,  Reverend Charles A

Babcock, Reverend Charles A

Male 1849 - 1941  (92 years)

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  • Name Babcock, Charles A 
    Title Reverend 
    Born 29 Oct 1849  Verona, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Residence 1871  Portland, Leeds, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1881  Hinchinbrooke, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1891  Hinchinbrooke, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1901  Hallowell, Prince Edward, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Minister 
    Residence 1911  Assiniboia, Saskatchewan, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1927  Watertown, Jefferson, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 09 Dec 1941  Kingston, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I31852  Sullivan Burgess Family Tree
    Last Modified 1 Jan 2017 

    Father Babcock, John Prince,   b. Abt 1801, Kingston, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Jan 1872, Verona, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 71 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Chatterson, Sarah Ann,   b. 27 Feb 1806, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Dec 1893, Verona, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Family ID F10869  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Drader, Christie Anne,   b. 20 Mar 1852, Portland, Leeds, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 02 May 1922, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Married 12 Jul 1873 
    Children 
     1. Babcock, Lucy Alma,   b. 1876, Loughborough, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 04 Jun 1923, Verona, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 47 years)  [natural]
     2. Babcock, Mary Maud Minnie,   b. Abt 1878, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     3. Babcock, Thagan A,   b. 1880, Hinchinbrooke, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     4. Babcock, Albert,   b. 02 Aug 1884, Hinchinbrooke, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     5. Babcock, Alfred,   b. 20 Aug 1884, Hinchinbrooke, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     6. Babcook, Eveline Grace,   b. 06 May 1887, Hinchinbrooke, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     7. Babcock, Myrtle L,   b. 11 Jun 1889, Hinchinbrooke, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     8. Babcock, Harriet "Hattie" May,   b. 16 Dec 1891, Hinchinbrooke, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     9. Babcock, Elizabeth,   b. 1895, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1897  (Age 2 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 1 Jan 2017 
    Family ID F10868  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 McIntyre, Tressie May,   b. Abt 1865, Simcoe, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 01 Nov 1922  Barrie, Simcoe, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 1 Jan 2017 
    Family ID F10870  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 29 Oct 1849 - Verona, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1871 - Portland, Leeds, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1881 - Hinchinbrooke, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1891 - Hinchinbrooke, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Minister - 1901 - Hallowell, Prince Edward, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1911 - Assiniboia, Saskatchewan, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 01 Nov 1922 - Barrie, Simcoe, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1927 - Watertown, Jefferson, New York, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 09 Dec 1941 - Kingston, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Family Crest
    Babcock Family Crest
    Babcock Family Crest
    This interesting surname is of early medieval English origin, and is a diminutive of the baptismal name "Babb". The medieval female given name "Babb" is a pet form of Barbara, deriving from the Greek term "barbaros" meaning "foreigner", which was borne by an enormously popular but almost certainly non-existent saint, who according to legend was imprisoned in a tower and later put to death by her own father for refusing to recant her Christian beliefs. Babb may also be a nickname from the Middle English "bab(e)", baby. However, a more probable source is from the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name "Babba", of uncertain origin, found in several placenames, including Babbacombe in Devon, and Babington in Somerset. The suffix "-cock", applied to a young lad who strutted proudly like a cock, and soon became a generic term for a youth, and was attached with hypocoristic force to the short forms of many medieval given names. Alwinus Babb is noted in the 1198 Feet of Fines of Sussex. On July 26th 1649, the marriage of Elizabeth Babcock and Robert Holiday took place in Snaith, Yorkshire, and the marriage of Margaret Babcock and Thomas Thornley took place at Manchester Cathedral, Lancashire, on November 17th 1751. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Edward Babcock, which was dated November 16th 1578, marriage to Janet Spencer, at Halifax, Yorkshire, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth 1, known as "Good Queen Bess", 1558 - 1603. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

  • Notes 
    • OBITUARY: Charles A. Babcock died in the Kingston General Hospital, December 9, 1941, in his ninety-third year. He was converted over fifty years ago when Free Methodism was first introduced into this part of the county. For a number of years he served as a supply preacher on a number of circuits in the East Ontario Conference. Some years ago he transferredto the Standard Church, was ordained by that church, and served as an evangelist till age prevented his activity. Funeral was held in the Free Methodist Church in Verona. the undersigned had charge of the service, assisted by several other ministers. Rev. Mr. Scamehorn preached the sermon. Interment in the Verona Cemetery. S.B. Griffith (the Free Methodist, January 2, 1942)

      One year previous to his birth, Charles Babcock’s parents moved to a log house, which had been built by John Dony Thompson on or near a lake called Rock Lake, now called Verona. Charles Babcock was born in this log house on October 29, 1849.
      Charles was about five years old when a school was built. He learned to read and write and later arithmetic. When he was 10 years old his father sold the home and bought a well timbered lot a short distance north. At age 16, Charles went to work for a farmer at harvest time on the shores of Lake Ontario. On November 6, 1867 he went north to work for an American Lumbering Company. Charles also worked on different waters, also on a railway and on a survey.
      Charles Babcock married Clista Ann Draider on July 12, 1872. He raised money to pay off the mortgage on the farm after his father died in January 1872 but since one brother refused to sign off, the farm was lost. Charles got fifty acres eight miles north of Verona in ca 1876. Charles and Clista had four children. The whole family got diphtheria. When Charles recovered he went to Michigan to work in the lumber woods. When Charles returned home he got hired on a railway extension but took a chill fever and had to return home. When he got better, Charles went to Beaver Falls, N.Y. and was hired to go into the woods and pull tan bark. After two weeks the fever returned and eventually Charles went back home. Charles next took a job making railroad ties. He lived 14 miles from Ambrose. Charles and his family had the fever the next four summers. His children all got the measles and their only boy died at three years of age. Charles and Clista had two more boys but both got sick and passed away within two weeks of each other.
      Charles sold out and his second home was at Oak Flats. He later on went to the headwaters of the Mississippi to “drive the river”. Upon returning home, sold their home and rented a farm. While there their youngest child passed away. The next spring they rented a place in Verona. Charles took up preaching, as a Free Methodist Minister, near Marmora, in Hastings County. To make money he hired on with a farmer during harvest time. Then Charles bought an adjoining piece of land, which had been sold for taxes (100 acres). After trying to farm decided to preach again. He took charge of a circuit at Beaver Creek. Charles attended as a delegate to a conference at Toronto. Charles sold all his possession to buy a colt and harness so he could return to Beaver Creek. In 1898 Charles went to his first circuit by appointment from the East Ontario Conference held in Toronto. The family consisted of his wife and four children. They rented a small frame house in the middle of a pasture field. Charles had two appointments, Beaver Creek Church, about two miles away and Rockdale School House, about eight miles away. At the 1899 Free Methodist Conference of East Ontario Charles was appointed to the Picton circuit. Here they rented a place with a house, barn and an orchard. In 1900 he was re-appointed to the Picton, Bloomfield and Ridge Road Circuit. In May 1901 Charles went to the town of Deseronto, which was about 18 miles from Picton on the Bay of Quinte at the mouth of the Napanee River. Later they rented a house in the home village of Oak Flats and the family moved again. First call Charles had was to Pratt’s Corners north of Maberly. From there the next circuit was Vennacher. In 1903 C. A. Babcock was appointed to Beaver Creek, Cordova and Rockdale Circuit. This time there was a parsonage to live in. In 1905 Charles was appointed to Trent Bridge and Victoria. Here they rented a house at the mines. Also rented a company’s store and set up business. In 1906 C.A. Babcock was appointed to Housey’s Rapid, Coopers Falls, Barkway and Muskoka. From there the family moved to a farm near Picton. Then Charles was appointed to Westport, Fermoy, Perth Road, North Shore and Maberly. Then he moved to his son-in-laws home at Verona. On May 3, 1909 Charles bought a farm and became a farmer again. They lived on the farm until part of the hay was taken off and then sold the farm back to its original owners. In 1909 C.A. Babcock was appointed to Gunter and McCrae but instead went west. On November 16, 1909 Charles left for Roseview, SK. In May 1910 his wife and one girl moved to Roseview. To make ends meet, Charles worked at well digging, then at stook threshing. In the spring of 1910 Charles went to see his sister at Mount Green where his brother-in-law had a farm and kept Post Office. Charles took up a homestead but could not take possession for one year. In 1910 was appointed to the Mount Green, SK circuit. In March 1911 Charles secured his homestead. The next circuit Charles was appointed to was Mount Green and Knoxville. Their third youngest daughter was married that summer but died the next June. She is buried in Mount Green Cemetery. In 1912 Charles wife was poorly and was longing for her home. In 1913 they disposed of their personal goods and went to Estevan. They bought train tickets and landed back in their hometown, Verona, on November 21st. Once getting his wife settled Charles prepared to go to Alabama but never went. In 1914 they built a house at Verona. In 1915 he took a mail route but in 1916 was appointed to the Enterprise and Fifth Lake circuit. In 1917 Charles was appointed to Picton. In 1919 Charles went to meetings at Perry Road, six miles west of Kalader, Flinton and Cloyne. In the spring of 1922 Charles went home to Verona. His wife died 2 May 1922 and was buried in Verona Cemetery. In May 1925 Charles was appointed to Hillsdale and Crown Hill between Barrie and Georgian Bay. He worked the circuit from Verona. Charles Babcock died in the Kingston General Hospital on 9 December 1941. He is not actually buried in the Verona Cemetery but in the adjoing property of Mr. E. McKnight.
      The following is a poem written by Charles Babcock: It was in the year of 49, October 29,
      When I first saw the light of day - I reckon from that time:
      I was brought up by a mother dear, tender, kind and true,
      But I wandered far in paths of sin, without an end in view.
      Of brothers there were nine of us, and sisters there were two;
      Isaac died in infant days, and passed from mortal view:
      The rest grew up to manhood’s years, to sail life’s ocean o’er,
      They all have crossed the line of world’s we see them here no more.
      We sang and danced, and drank and fought, and cheered with hellish glee,
      My father died; he passed away, no future good to see:
      My heart was hard, I still event on in ways I would not tell,
      My soul was dark and I was on the downward road to hell.
      My mother lived to ripe old age, I think she was eighty-seven,
      She sought and found the Lord, though late; I think she will enter heaven
      We bade farewell to mother, dear, we are glad the Lord she found:
      We laid her silent clay away until the trumpet’s sound.
      In eighteen hundred seventy-two we joined in wedlock bans,
      A moral girl to say the least then stood at my right hand:
      Eleven were of this union born; of boys they numbered three,
      God took them home in infancy from sin and misery.
      Two infant girls soon passed away, were torn from our embrace,
      We did not know the love of God, his goodness could not trace:
      We sought and found His pardoning love, we said, “He doeth well”,
      He saved us from a formal slate and from a yawning hell.
      We soon will hear the trumpet’s peal, that will pierce the earth and sky,
      It will wake the dead, the living change in twinkling of an eye:
      We’ll see our loved ones gone before, who were redeemed from sin,
      The pearly gates will open wide and let the ransomed in.
      Father, son and Spirit, too, will say, “You’re welcome home”,
      The bride elect will gather round and say “We’re glad you’ve come home”:
      Join hands with saints and angels, too, and the Man of Calvary,
      We will tune our harps and sing again when we stand by the glassy sea.