Babcock,  John Prince

Babcock, John Prince

Male Abt 1801 - 1872  (~ 71 years)

Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Babcock, John Prince 
    Born Abt 1801  Kingston, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Residence 1861  Portland, Leeds, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1871  Portland, Leeds, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died Jan 1872  Verona, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I31854  Sullivan Burgess Family Tree
    Last Modified 1 Jan 2017 

    Family Chatterson, Sarah Ann,   b. 27 Feb 1806, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Dec 1893, Verona, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years) 
    Children 
    +1. Babcock, Charles A,   b. 29 Oct 1849, Verona, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 09 Dec 1941, Kingston, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 1 Jan 2017 
    Family ID F10869  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - Abt 1801 - Kingston, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1861 - Portland, Leeds, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1871 - Portland, Leeds, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Jan 1872 - Verona, Frontenac, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Babcock, John Prince
    Babcock, John Prince

    Family Crest
    Babcock Family Crest
    Babcock Family Crest
    This interesting surname is of early medieval English origin, and is a diminutive of the baptismal name "Babb". The medieval female given name "Babb" is a pet form of Barbara, deriving from the Greek term "barbaros" meaning "foreigner", which was borne by an enormously popular but almost certainly non-existent saint, who according to legend was imprisoned in a tower and later put to death by her own father for refusing to recant her Christian beliefs. Babb may also be a nickname from the Middle English "bab(e)", baby. However, a more probable source is from the Olde English pre 7th Century personal name "Babba", of uncertain origin, found in several placenames, including Babbacombe in Devon, and Babington in Somerset. The suffix "-cock", applied to a young lad who strutted proudly like a cock, and soon became a generic term for a youth, and was attached with hypocoristic force to the short forms of many medieval given names. Alwinus Babb is noted in the 1198 Feet of Fines of Sussex. On July 26th 1649, the marriage of Elizabeth Babcock and Robert Holiday took place in Snaith, Yorkshire, and the marriage of Margaret Babcock and Thomas Thornley took place at Manchester Cathedral, Lancashire, on November 17th 1751. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Edward Babcock, which was dated November 16th 1578, marriage to Janet Spencer, at Halifax, Yorkshire, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth 1, known as "Good Queen Bess", 1558 - 1603. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

  • Notes 
    • From the Autobiography of Chas A. Babcock
      "Our family being quite large, my father built an addition to the log house, thus making two rooms and a small upstairs which was reached by a rung ladder set up in the corner. We had what was called a Dutch fireplace, which served for heat, light and cooking. The bread was baked in large kettles with lids, covered with hot sand; and in the summer in a stone oven outside, which was heated by making a fire in the oven, then the fire was removed and the bread put in. For baking pancakes we had a jack with notches in which to put the panhandle in order to set the pan at the required angle to the fire; also a crane to swing pots on or off. In the winter the fireplace held fire and in the summer the punk and flint and steel were used, or some powder was put in a gun with a cotton rag on top, and when fired the cloth would be alight. For a lantern we had a round tin with a bottom to hold a tallow candle. The body of the lantern was perforated with small round holes and small slits between to give lights. In the house, when they had no candles, they tied a large button in a cloth, set it in a disk and put lard or other grease on it. When oil was found in Pennsylvania, the local merchants purchased oil lamps. These were small glass lamps with a brass screw on each side to hold the chimney in place. My father, John Prince, got one with instructions not to move the lamp when lighted, for there was danger of an explosion. That lamp and chimney lasted my mother’s lifetime.
      As for roads, there was no traveling to the south in the spring of the year, as we lived north of a large drowned land. The water was the main thoroughfare in the summer; we could go ten miles by water without coming to a waterfall. Very few people had horses in those days and buggies or spring wagons were unknown. Oxen did work on the land and on the road.
      My father suffered serious setbacks. He had one pair of horses and two pairs of oxen. My brother made a bee to build a log crossway for a road into where he lived and while my father’s best team of oxen were hauling logs a tree fell on them, killing one. The other one he sold. While working with the other pair in a swamp, one broke his leg and they made beef of him. Then while one of the horses was going to drink, he fell on a broken cooler and it killed him. Thus father was left with a colt and a steer for a team.
      In those days there were a few, but very few, who did not indulge more or less in drinking; whisky was cheap and plentiful. Two great days were July 12 and November 5th. When I [Charles] was about five years of age a schoolhouse was built, to which my two sisters and I went. We had one book and a slate and later on we had an arithmetic. We learned to read and write, which were the all important part of learning in those days. As my people could not read, they had only one book that was an old bible, given to them by a government peddler.
      When I [Charles] was about ten years old my father sold the home [abt 1858] and being a lumberman he bought a well timbered lot a short distance north, where he built a large log house. At that time our family was composed of my parents, two girls and two boys. Clearing the land was the order in the summer and lumbering in the winter. Soon the timber was gone and my father went to the government limits, put up a shanty, hired a gang of men, and spent the winters in the woods.
      My father, I may say, was a large, able man, honest in his dealings, generous to a fault and set us many good examples. He worked faithfully and made money. They depended chiefly on the winter’s work for money to tide them over the summer."