Clarke,  Captain William I

Clarke, Captain William I

Male 1609 - 1690  (81 years)

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  • Name Clarke, William 
    Title Captain 
    Suffix
    Born 1609  Dorset, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Find A Grave Memorial 11075779 
    Died 18 Jul 1690  Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Bridge Street Cemetery
    Person ID I6124  Sullivan Burgess Family Tree
    Last Modified 15 Sep 2018 

    Family Strong, Sarah,   b. 1613, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Sep 1675, Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years) 
    Married Abt 1637  Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Clarke, William II,   b. 3 Jul 1656, Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 May 1725, Lebanon, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 15 Sep 2018 
    Family ID F2237  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1609 - Dorset, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - Abt 1637 - Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 18 Jul 1690 - Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Headstones
    Clarke, William Grave Stone
    Clarke, William Grave Stone
    Clarke, William I Grave Stone
    Clarke, William I Grave Stone

    Family Crest Clarke Family Crest
    (At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.)

  • Notes 
    • Was born in England in 1609 and came to America in the "Mary and John;" leaving Plymouth, England, March 20, 1630, and landing at Nantasket, now Hull, May 30 1630. He and his Wife Sarah were members of the Church in Dorchester in 1637. He was made freeman in 1639 and was selectman in 1646-50. He was a man of standing and influence, honored and trusted, in civil and military affairs.

      He removed to Northampton in 1657, where he organized a train band of sixty men in 1661, was chosen lieutenant and commander in 1662, and served in King Philip's war. He was selectman for twenty years, deputy to the General Court fifteen years and associate judge ten years. His first Wife Sarah died Sept. 6, 1675 and he married Nov. 15, 1676, Sarah, widow of Thomas Cooper of Springfield. She died May 8, 1688, and he died July 18, 1690, aged 81 years.

      Lieutenant William Clarke, immigrant, was born in Dorsetshire, England. Family tradition says that he came to New England in the ship "Mary and John, " leaving Plymouth, England, March 30, 1630. His name also appears in the list of passengers in the "Mary and John" which sailed from London, March 24, 1633.

      He settled at Dorchester before 1635, where he was a prominent citizen, selectman, 1646-50. In 1653 he was one of the petitioners to settle in Northampton, and he removed there in 1659. His Wife rode on horseback with two baskets or panniers slung across the horse, carrying a boy in each basket and one on her lap, her Husband, fifty years old, preceding on foot.

      He was granted twelve Acres on the west side of what is now Elm street, bordering on Mill river and comprising to-day the north half of the campus of Smith College.

      He built a log house where he lived until 1681, when it was burned, being set on fire by a Negro, Jack, a servant of Samuel Wolcott, who took a brand of fire from the hearth and swung it up and down to "find victuals. " The new house built in its place remained standing until 1826.

      Lieutenant Clarke organized in 1661 a train band of sixty men, which he commanded in King Philip's war. He served as selectman twenty years and was also judge of the court.

      In 1884 a monument was erected to his memory by his descendants. The old gravestone is still preserved. (Source: New England Families, Vol. IV, Genealogies and Memorials, Page 1652)