Calkins,  Hugh

Calkins, Hugh

Male 1600 - 1690  (90 years)

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  • Name Calkins, Hugh  [1
    Born 1600  Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Baptism 1600  Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Find A Grave Memorial 34216123 
    Name Caulkins 
    Possessions 1650  [2
    New London Land Grant 
    Died 1690  Norwich, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 1690  Norwich, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Old Norwichtown Cemetery
    Person ID I6246  Sullivan Burgess Family Tree
    Last Modified 15 Sep 2018 

    Father Calkins, William,   b. Abt 1570, Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Calkins,   b. Abt 1572, Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Relationship natural 
    Family ID F2314  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Eaton, Ann,   b. 1605, Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Jun 1688, Norwich, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years) 
    Married 1622  Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Calkins, John,   b. 1634, Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Jan 1702, Norwich, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)  [natural]
     2. Calkins, Deborah,   b. 18 Mar 1644, Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    Last Modified 15 Sep 2018 
    Family ID F2313  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1600 - Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBaptism - 1600 - Chepstow, Monmouthshire, Wales Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1622 - Saybrook, Middlesex, Connecticut, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 1690 - Norwich, New London, Connecticut, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 1690 - Norwich, New London, Connecticut, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Headstones
    Calkins, Hugh 1663 Ann with John Clkins and Sarah Royce Grave Stone
    Calkins, Hugh 1663 Ann with John Clkins and Sarah Royce Grave Stone

    Family Crest
    Calkins Family Crest
    Calkins Family Crest

  • Notes 
    • NOTES from: "History of Norwich, New London, Connecticut, USA", by Frances Manwaring Caulkins, 1866. page 171. Hugh Calkins (or Caulkins) was one of a body of emigrants, called the Welsh Company, that came to New England in 1640, from Chepstow in Monmouthshire, on the border of Wales, with their minister, the Reverend Mr. Blinman. The larger portion of this company settled first at Marshfield, but soon transferred their residence to Gloucester, upon the rough promontory of Cape Ann. From thence, after eight years of experiment, most of them removed to New London, hoping probably to find lands more Arable and productive, and allured also by affectionate attachment to Mr. Blinman whom Mr. Winthrop had invited to his plantation.

      Hugh Calkins was, in 1650, deputy from Gloucester to the General Court of Massachusetts, and chosen again in 1651, but removing early in that year to New London, the vacancy was filled by another election. While living at New London, he was chosen twelve times deputy to the Connecticut, USA Assembly (the elections being semi-annual) and was one of the townsmen, or select-men, invariably, from 1652 till he removed to Norwich.

      From Norwich he was deputy at ten sessions of the Legislature, between March, 1663 and October, 1671, and was one of the first deacons of the Norwich Church. At each of the three towns in which he was an early settler and Proprietor, he was largely employed in public business, being usually appointed one of committees for consultation, for fortifying, drafting soldiers, settling difficulties, and particularly for surveying lands and determining boundaries. These offices imply a considerable range of information, as well as activity and executive talent, yet he seems to have had no early education, uniformly making only a bold H. for his signature.

      In a deposition made in 1672, he stated that he was then 72 years of age. The year 1600 may therefore be taken as the date of his birth. Of his Wife, we only known that her name was Ann. Six children have been traced, four of whom were probably born before the emigration to this country.

      Sarah, supposed to be the oldest child, was married at Gloucester, October 28, 1645 to William Hough. This couple removed in 1651 to New London, and several of their descendants afterwards settled in Norwich and its vicinity.

      Mary was married at Gloucester, November 8, 1649 to Hugh Roberts; and these also followed the fortunes of the family to New London.

      Rebecca died at Gloucester, March 14, 1651.

      Deborah was born at Gloucester, March 18, 1643-4, and is the only one of the children the date of whose birth has been ascertained. She married Jonathan Royce, one of the first band of Norwich proprietors.

      The two sons of Hugh Calkins were John and David. The former removed with his Father to Norwich. David remained in New London. Deacon Hugh Calkins died in 1690, aged about 90 years.

      "The towne have agreed with Peter BLATCHFORD to beat the drum all saboth dayes, training dayes, and town publique meetings for the sume of 3lb., to be paid him in a towne rate. " "As a finale to the history of the barn so long used for a Church, we may here notice a fact gleaned from the Court records of some fifteen or eighteen years' later date. William ROGERS, the owner of the building, had returned to Boston, and on his death the heirs of his estate claimed that the rent had not been fully paid; and Hugh CAULKINS, who had been the town's surety, then a Proprietor in Norwich, finds himself suddenly served with a writ from Mr. LEAKE, a Boston attorney, for £3 10s., the amount of the debt. He accordingly satisfied the demand, and then applied to the town for redress. The obligation was acknowledged, and a vote passed to indemnify the surety. " Feb. 27, '72-3.

      "Upon demand made by Hugh CALKIN for money due to Mr. LEAKE, of Boston, for improvement of a barn of Goodman ROGERS, which said CALKIN stood engaged to pay, this town doth promise to pay one barrel of pork to said CALKIN some time the next winter. " On the north of the meeting-house was the Lot reserved for purposes of sepulture. The ordinance which describes its bounds and legally sets it apart for this use is dated June 6th, 1653, and declares "it shall ever bee for a Common Buriall place, and never be impropriated by any. " This is the oldest graveyard in New London.

      "Early in 1651, New Street, in the rear of the town Plot, was opened for the accommodation of the Cape Ann company. This position was designated as "beyond the brook and the ministry Lot. ' It was carved into house-lots and took the name of Cape Ann Lane. The lots on this street were nine in number, of six Acres each, extending both sides of the narrow street from the alder swamp in front to Cedar Swamp on the west. Beginning at the lower end, Hugh CALKINS had the first Lot by the Lyme road, or highway to Nahantick, as it was then called, and next him was his son-in-law Hugh ROBERTS, then COIT, LESTER, AVERY, ALLYN, Maine, USAADES, HOUGH, ISBELL. The BEEBYS and MARSHALLS were yet farther north. James MORGAN was 'on the path to New Street' (i. e., Ashcraft Street). William KENNY was nearly opposite the south entrance to New Street, on the Nahantick road. PARKER was next below him, at the head of Close Cove, and WELLMAN on the same cove, southeast of PARKER. WELLMAN and COITE, however, exchanged lots; the latter was a ship-carpenter and wished to be near the water, where he could be accommodated with a building-years. "

      Indian Troubles. -In 1652 a general apprehension existed throughout the country that the Indians were preparing for hostilities. The Narragansetts were especially regarded with suspicion, and preparations were made in the frontier towns to guard against surprise. At Pequot the town orders were peremptory for arming individuals and keeping a vigilant eye upon the natives. Watchmen were kept on the look-out both night and day. A fresh supply of ammunition was procured and the following directions published:

      "July 8, 1652.
      "Forfeiture of false raising of an alarum, 10l.
      "Forfeiture of not coming when an alarum is raised, 5l.
      "Forfeiture of not coming to there pticular squadron, 5l.
      "It is agreed yt it shall be a just alarum when 3 gunnes are distinctly shot of, and the drum striking up an alarum.
      "If the watchmen here a gunn in the night, they well considering where the gunn was firing if they conceive to be in the Towne may raise an alarum.
      "For the seting of a gunn for a wolfe they yt set a gunn for that end shall acquaint the constable where he sets it that he may acquaint the watch. "

      Three places in the town were fortified, the mill, the meeting-house, and the house of Hugh CAULKINS, which stood at the lower end of the town, near the entrance of Cape Ann Lane. The inhabitants were divided into three squadrons, and in case of an alarm Sergt. MINER's squadron was to repair to Hugh CAULKINS', Captain DENISON's to the meeting-house, and Lieutenant SMITH's to the mill.

      The Patent of the Town of Norwich, A. D. 1685

      Whereas the General Court of Connecticut, USA have forever granted unto the proprietors and Inhabitants of the Towne of Norwich all those lands, both meadows and uplands within these abuttments (viz.) from the mouth of Tradeingcove Brooke the line to run as the Brooke to the head of the Brooke to a white oake marked N: and from thence west nortwesterly to a great pond to a black oake marked N: wich stands neere the mouth of the great Brooke that runs out of the pond to Norwich river, which is about seven miles from the said Tradeing Cove; and from thence the line runns North noreast nine miles to a Black oake standing by the river side on the south of it, a little above maumeagway, and from thence the line runs south southeasterly nine miles to a white oake standing by a brooke marked N: and then the line runs south southwesterly nine miles to a white oake neere Robert ALLYN and Thomas ROSE's Dwelling houses, which tree is marked N: and from thence westerly as New London Bounds runs to Mohegen river, the whole being nine miles square, the said land haveing been by purchase or otherwise lawfully obtayned of the Indian natives proprietors. - And whereas, the said Inhabitants and proprietors of the sd Norwich in the Colony of Connecticutt have made application to the Governor and Company of the sd Colony of Conecticutt assembled in Court May 2th, 1685, that they may have a patent for the confirmation of the aforesd land, so purchased and granted to them as aforesaid, and which they have stood seized, and quietly possesd of for many years late past without interuption. Now for a more full confirmation of the aforesd unto the present proprietors of the sd Towneship of Norwich in their possession and injoyment of the premises, know yea that the sd Governour and Company assembled in Generall Court according to the Commission Granted to them by his magestie's charter, have given and granted and by therse presents doe give, grant Rattifie and confirme unto Mr. James FITCH senr, Captain James FITCH, Mr. Benjamine BREWSTER, Lieutenant Thomas TRACY, Lieutenant Tho. LEFFINGWELL, Mr. Christopher HUNTINGTON, Mr. Simon HUNTINGTON, Ensign William BACKUS, Mr. Thomas WATERMAN, Mr. John BURCHARD and Mr. John POST, and the rest of the said present proprietors of the township of Norwich, their heirs, suckcessors and assigns forever; the aforesaid parcell of land as it is Butted and Bounded toghether will all the woods, meadows, pastures, ponds, waters, rivers, islands, fishings, huntings, fowleings, mines, mineralls, quarries, and precious stones, upon or within the said tract of land, and all other proffitts and comodities therunto belonging, or in any wayes appertaining; and Doe also grant unto the aforesaid Mr. James FITCH senr, Captain James FITCH, Mr. Benjamine BREWSTER, Lieutenant Thomas TRACY, Lieutenant Tho. LEFFINGWELL, Mr. Christopher HUNTINGTON, Mr. Simon HUNTINGTON, Ensign William BACKUS, Mr. Thomas WATERMAN, Mr. John BURCHARD and Mr. John POST, and the rest of the proprietors, Inhabitants of Norwich, their heirs, successors and assigns forever, that the foresd tract of land shall be forever hereafter deemed, reputed and be an intire towneship of itself - to have and to hold the said tract of land and premises with all and singuler their appurtenances, together with the priviledges and immunities and franchises herein given and granted unto the sayd Mr. James FITCH senr, Captain James FITCH, Mr. Benjamine BREWSTER, Lieutenant Thomas TRACY, Lieutenant Tho. LEFFINGWELL, Mr. Christopher HUNTINGTON, Mr. Simon HUNTINGTON, Ensign William BACKUS, Mr. Thomas WATERMAN, Mr. John BURCHARD and Mr. John POST, and other the present proprietors, Inhabitants of Norwich, theire heirs successors, and assignes for ever, and to the only proper use and behoofe of the sayd Mr. James FITCH senr, Captain James FITCH, Mr. Benjamine BREWSTER, Lieutenant Thomas TRACY, Lieutenant Tho. LEFFINGWELL, Mr. Christopher HUNTINGTON, Mr. Simon HUNTINGTON, Ensign William BACKUS, Mr. Thomas WATERMAN, Mr. John BURCHARD and Mr. John POST, and other proprietors, inhabitants of Norwich, their heirs, successors, and assigns for ever according to the Tenor of East Greenwich in Kent, in free and common soccage and not in capitto, nor are they capable according to the custom of the country, yielding, rendering and paieing therefore our sovereign Lord the King, his heires and successors, his dues according to Charter. In witness whereof, we have caused the Seale of the Colony to be hereunto affixed this twenty-first of May, 1685, in the year of the reigne of our sovereign lord James the Second, by the grace of God, of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the faith. ROBERT TREAT, Governor. {SEAL} March 30th, 1687, pr order of the Govr and Compony of the Colony of Connecticut, USA. Signed pr JOHN ALLYN, Secrety. Entered in the pub. records, Lib. D: fo. 138, 139, Novr 27th, 1685 pr JOHN ALLYN, Secrety.

  • Sources 
    1. [S206] Hyde Genealogy Descendants in the Female as Well as in the Male Lines by Reuben Hyde Walworth, Reuben Hyde Walworth, (Date: 1864;).

    2. [S201] History of New London, Connecticut, Miss Frances Manwaring Caulkins.