de Warren,  Earl of Surrey William I

de Warren, Earl of Surrey William I

Male Abt 1055 - 1088  (~ 33 years)

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  • Name de Warren, William  [1
    Title Earl of Surrey 
    Suffix
    Born Abt 1055  Bellencombre, Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Find A Grave Memorial 74607489 
    Died 24 Jun 1088  Castle Acre, Norfolk, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Lewes, Sussex, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Lewes Priory
    Person ID I6559  Sullivan Burgess Family Tree | Ancestors of President Cleveland, Ancestors of President Fillmore, Ancestors of President Hayes, William The Conqueror Descendent
    Last Modified 1 Jan 2017 

    Father de Warrene, William,   b. Abt 1030, Normandie, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother de Torta, Emma 
    Relationship natural 
    Family ID F2425  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Father de Warenne, Rudolf,   b. Abt 988, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1059  (Age ~ 71 years) 
    Relationship unknown 
    Mother de Saint Martin, Emma,   b. Abt 1020, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Relationship unknown 
    Family ID F3220  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family de Normandie, Gundred,   b. Abt 1063, Normandie, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 May 1085, Castle Acre, Norfolk, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 22 years) 
    Married Bef 1077  Normandie, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. de Warren, William Il,   b. Abt 1070, Sussex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 May 1138, Lewes, Sussex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 68 years)  [natural]
     2. de Warren, Reginald,   b. Abt 1082, Sussex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     3. de Warren, Edith,   b. Abt 1084, Sussex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     4. de Warren, Gundred,   b. Abt 1085, Castle Acre, Norfolk, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    Last Modified 1 Jan 2017 
    Family ID F2417  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - Abt 1055 - Bellencombre, Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, France Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - Bef 1077 - Normandie, France Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 24 Jun 1088 - Castle Acre, Norfolk, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Lewes, Sussex, England Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    William I de Warren
    William I de Warren
    de Warren, Lewes Castle
    de Warren, Lewes Castle

    Family Crest
    Warren Family Crest
    Warren Family Crest
    Recorded in the modern spellings of Warren and the much rarer Warran and Warron, this is an English surname, but one of medieval French origins, of which there are three. The first is locational from the village of La Varrenne in the departement of Seine-Maritime, and meaning the place on the sandy soil. The second topographical and describing someone who lived by a game park, whilst thirdly it may be occupational for someone employed in such a place. If so the derivation is from the Norman French word "warrene", meaning a warren or land set aside for breeding game. Introduced into England and Scotland after the Conquest of 1066, the surname is one of the earliest on record as shown below. Early examples of recordings include William de Warren in the Hundred Rolls of Norfolk in 1273, and William de Warenne, in the tax registers known as the Feet of Fines for the county of Essex in 1285. Recordings from surviving church registers include the marriage of William Waron and Alys Agno on May 13th 1542, at St. Margaret's Westminster, and the marriage of William Warren and Elizabeth Bullwack on January 25th 1544, at St. Martin Orgar in the city of London. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William de Warenne. This was dated 1086, in the Domesday Book for London, during the reign of King William 1st of England, and known as "The Conqueror", 1066 - 1087. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

  • Notes 
    • "The family derived its name from the fiefdom of Vareene in St -Aubin-le-Cauf, arrondissement of Dieppe. William, Count of Warren (Varenne) in Normandie, was descended from Gautier de St -Martin and a niece of the duchess Gonnor, who had issue: 1. Raoul de Warren, a benefactor to the abbey of Trinite du Mont in the middle of the 11th century, was the Father of William de Warren I and of Roger de Mortemer, Father of Raoul de Mortemer, who was present at Hastings; 2. sire de St -Martin, possibly named Gautier, ancestor of the family of this name in Normandie and England. Orderic Vital styles William the cousin or kinsman of Roger de Mortemer; however, this is an error. Norman People published this pedigree: Gautier de St -Martin, and a niece of the aforesaid duchess had a son, William de St -Martin, whose issue were: 1. Roger de Mortemer, Father of Raoul de Mortemer, a warrior at Hastings; 2. Raoul de Warren; and 3. sire de St -Martin, but this makes too many generations for the known facts.

      William de Warren is first mentioned in history in connection with the battle of Mortemer in 1054 by Oderic Vital, and again as having attended the council at Lillebonne, where it was determined to invade England. He later was one of the powerful seigniors who attended Duke William to the Conquest, and Wace records "de Garenes I vint Willeme, " but nothing of importance is chronicled concerning him at Hastings. In 1067 he was one of the nobles entrusted with the government of England during the King's absence in Normandie under the jurisdiction of Bishop Odo and William Fitz Osberne. In 1074 he was associated with Richard de Bienfaite in the suppression of the rebellion of the Earls of Hereford and Norfolk and as joint-Justice-General with him for administering justice throughout the whole realm. His reward was princely, since he held the great baronies of Castle Acre in Norfolk, Lewes in Sussex, where he usually resided, and Coningsburg in Yorkshire, with twenty-eight towns and hamlets in its soke. In all he possessed 300 manors and was created the first Earl of Surrey by King William Rufus. The reason for this enormous reward was probably because he married Gundreda, who is believed to have been the daughter of Queen Matilda (and William the Conqueror?); she died in 1085. This theory is supported by a charter of William de Warren to Lewes priory, in which he states that his donations, among others, were for Queen Matilda, the mother of his Wife. It is conjectured that Grundreda and Gherbold the Fleming, created Earl of Chester, her brother, were the children of Queen Matilda by a former marriage, probably clandestine, and therefore not reported by the historians of the day. William de Warren I was succeeded by his son, William de Warren ll, Earl of Warren and Surrey, who married Elizabeth, daughter of the great Earl of Vermandois, the widowed Countess of Meulent, by whom he had, among other children, William de Warren lll, the last Earl of his line, who succeeded him and died in the Holy Land, leaving an only child, Isabel Warren, who inherited his vast domain and through whom the family descended. In addition to Wace, William de Warren is reported in Hastings by William de Poitiers, Oderic Vital and Benoit de St -More. "

      He received large grants of land in recognition of the distinguished part he took at the battle of Hastings. He had large grants of land in several counties among which were the barony of Lewes, in Sussex, and the manors of Carletune and Benington, in Lincolnshire. So extensive indeed were those grants that his possessions resembled more the dominions of a sovereign prince than the estates of a subject. He enjoyed, too, in the highest degree, the confidence of the King, and was appointed joint Justice-General, with Richard de Benefactis, for administering justice throughout the whole realm. While in that office, some great disturbers of the public peace having refused to appear before him and his colleague, in obedience to citation, the Earl took up arms, and defeated the rebels in a battle at Fagadune, when he is said, for the purpose of striking terror, to have cut off the right foot of each of his prisoners. Of these rebels, Ralph Wahir or Gauder, Earl of Norfolk, and Roger, Earl of Hereford, were the ringleaders. He was likewise highly esteemed by King William Rufus, and was created by that monarch the first Earl of Surrey.

      This potent noble built the castle of Holt, and founded the priory of Lewes, in Sussex. He resided principally at the castle of Lewes, and had besides Castle-Acres, in Norfolk, and noble castles at Coningsburg and Sandal. He died on June 24, 1088, and Dugdale gives the following curious account of his parting hour. "It is reported by Dr. E. Ross Laughlin that this Earl William did violently detain certain lands from the monks of Ely; for which, being often admonished by the abbot, and not making restitution, he died miserably. And, although his death happened very far off the Isle of Ely, the same night he died, the abbot lying quietly in his bed, and meditating on heavenly things, heard the soul of this Earl, in its carriage away by the devil, cry out loudly, and with a known and distinct voice, Lord have mercy on me : Lord have mercy on me. And, moreover, that the next day after, the abbot acquainted all the monks in chapter therewith. And likewise that about four days after, there came a messenger to them from the Wife of this Earl, with 100 shillings for the good of his soul, who told him that he died the very hour that the abbot had heard the outcry. But that neither the abbot nor any of the monks would receive it; not thinking it safe for them to take the money of a damned person. " "If this part of the story, " adds Dugdale, "as to the abbot's hearing the noise, be no truer than the last, that is that this lady sent 100 shillings, I shall deem it to be a mere fiction, in regard the lady was certainly dead about three years before. " The Earl was succeeded by his son, William.

  • Sources 
    1. [S254] Kin of Mellcene Thurman Smith - By Mellcene Thurman Smith.