Abramson,  Anna

Abramson, Anna

Female 1887 - 1970  (83 years)

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  • Name Abramson, Anna 
    Born 1887  Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Social Security Number Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    369-54-1455 
    Died 15 Apr 1970  Detroit, Wayne, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I7025  Sullivan Burgess Family Tree
    Last Modified 1 Jan 2017 

    Family Glenn, Orla C.,   b. Mar 1886, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 1909  [2
    Children 
     1. Glenn, Virginia,   b. Abt 1911, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     2. Glenn, Robert,   b. Abt 1914, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     3. Glenn, Ruth,   b. Abt 1916, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     4. Glenn, William,   b. Abt 1920, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     5. Glenn, Barbara Ann,   b. Abt 1923, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    Last Modified 1 Jan 2017 
    Family ID F2522  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1887 - Michigan, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsSocial Security Number - 369-54-1455 - - Michigan, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 15 Apr 1970 - Detroit, Wayne, Michigan, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Family Crest
    Abramson Family Crest
    Abramson Family Crest
    This long-established surname is of early medieval English origin, and is a patronymic form of the Hebrew male given name "Avraham", originally "Abram", "high father", later changed to "Abraham", "father of a multitude (of nations)". This name was borne by the first of the Jewish patriarchs, ancestor of all the Israelites (Genesis 11-25), and Abraham was the name of a priest in the Domesday Book of 1086. In 1170, one Abraham de Stradtuna was noted in the Documents relating to the Danelaw, Lincolnshire. This personal name was used to some extent among Christians in the Middle Ages, and has always been a popular Jewish given name. It was greatly revived after the Reformation, and was particularly popular in the Low Countries where it reverted to its original form of Abram, which is still used there, as it is in Wales. The first bearer of the extended form of the surname was John Abraham (Northamptonshire, 1193), and in 1273, one John Abraam was noted in the Hundred Rolls of Bedfordshire. Modern patronymic forms include: Abrahams, Abrams, Abrahamson and Abramson. On November 5th 1646, Sarah, daughter of Andrew and Gillian Abrams, was christened at St. Mary Abbots, Kensington, London. The Coat of Arms most associated with the name is a shield lozengy gold and red, on a black chief the sun in his splendour, gold, the Crest being a cap of maintenance decorated with a plume of ostrich feathers, all proper. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert Abram, which was dated 1252, in the "Chartulary of the Monastery of Ramsey", Huntingdonshire, during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.
    Abrahams Family Crest
    Abrahams Family Crest
    This long-established surname, recorded in the spellings of Abraham, Abrahams, Abrahamson, the latter two being patronymics, and the abbreviated Abrams, also a apparent patronymic, is of 12th century origin, and a 'Crusader' introduction into Britain. As such it was not Jewish, although of Hebrew influence. It is one of a group such as Isaac, Joseph, and Abel, which were given by the returning Christian soldiers to their sons in recognition of their 'visit' to the Holy Land. These subsequently developed into English surnames in their own right. 'Abraham' translates as 'The father of the nation', and as such was borne by the first of the Jewish patriarchs, (Genesis 11-25). The 1086 Domesday Book for London refers to 'Abraham', a priest in the established (Christian) church, whilst in 1170 Abraham de Stradtuna was recorded in the Danelaw rolls of Lincolnshire. As a Jewish surname it was revived after the 'reign' of Oliver Cromwell (1649 - 1658), who in 1655 repealed the exile order of Edward 1st in 1290, and allowed the re-settlement of the Jewish people in Britain. The earliest recordings include John Abraham of Bedford in the Hundred Rolls of 1273, and Magota Abrahams in the 1379 Poll Tax rolls of Yorkshire. Later recordings include Sarah Abram, who was christened at the church of St. Mary Abbots, Kensington, London, on November 5th 1646, whilst on June 17th 1666 Richard Abrahams was christened at St Dunstans in the East, Stepney. The Coat of Arms most associated with the name has a shield of lozengy, gold and red, on a black chief the sun in his splendour, gold. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of John Abraham, which was dated 1197, in the pipe rolls of Northamptonshire, during the reign of King Richard 1st, known as 'The Lionheart', 1189 - 1199. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.
    Abrams Family Crest
    Abrams Family Crest
    This long-established surname is of early medieval English origin, and is a patronymic form of the Hebrew male given name "Avraham", originally "Abram", "high father", later changed to "Abraham", "father of a multitude (of nations)". This name was borne by the first of the Jewish patriarchs, ancestor of all the Israelites (Genesis 11-25), and Abraham was the name of a priest in the Domesday Book of 1086. In 1170, one Abraham de Stradtuna was noted in the Documents relating to the Danelaw, Lincolnshire. This personal name was used to some extent among Christians in the Middle Ages, and has always been a popular Jewish given name. It was greatly revived after the Reformation, and was particularly popular in the Low Countries where it reverted to its original form of Abram, which is still used there, as it is in Wales. The first bearer of the extended form of the surname was John Abraham (Northamptonshire, 1193), and in 1273, one John Abraam was noted in the Hundred Rolls of Bedfordshire. Modern patronymic forms include: Abrahams, Abrams, Abrahamson and Abramson. On November 5th 1646, Sarah, daughter of Andrew and Gillian Abrams, was christened at St. Mary Abbots, Kensington, London. The Coat of Arms most associated with the name is a shield lozengy gold and red, on a black chief the sun in his splendour, gold, the Crest being a cap of maintenance decorated with a plume of ostrich feathers, all proper. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert Abram, which was dated 1252, in the "Chartulary of the Monastery of Ramsey", Huntingdonshire, during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

  • Sources 
    1. [S403] Social Security Death Index, Government of USA.

    2. [S151] Edith H. Arnott, (Location: Beverley, East Yorkshire, England; Date: December 1924;).